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Jordan Kobritz, Syndicated Columnist

Stories by Jordan

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If you read the headline, you know where this is going. After 17-plus years and more than 850 columns, I’m “retiring.” To be more precise, I’m retiring this column.

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For all the Bill Belichick haters out there — and there are legions of you — there’s one characteristic the New England Patriots’ coach has that employees of your favorite team probably lack: accountability.

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For athletes who are at the top of their game, it’s difficult to walk away from something they love doing.

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Tom Brady’s first return to Foxboro as a member of the visiting team proves once again that sports is all about the money, and those dollars touch a lot of different hands.

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Every sports league has an off-season when there’s a break from having games on the field, even if it seems like they go on year ’round.

Earlier this year, the Supreme Court decision in the Alston case threw the doors wide open to athletes who wanted to monetize their NIL (name, image and likeness) rights.

By Jordan Kobritz, Syndicated Columnist September 17, 2021
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Has there ever been a crazier summer in college sports?

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“Just think about it. Everybody needs to just think. There ain’t nobody thinking. Brains for sale. Never used. Operating racetracks,” said Kyle Busch, two-time NASCAR Cup Champion on changes to Atlanta Motor Speedway.

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In a unanimous landmark decision last week, the U.S. Supreme Court dealt a long overdue death knell to the NCAA’s sham argument that college athletes are amateurs.

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Those two words, uttered by the attorney for Matt Schembechler, the adopted son of former University of Michigan football coach Bo Schembechler, during a June 10 news conference said it all.

Japan is experiencing a spike in coronavirus infections, leading to renewed cries in some circles to cancel the Tokyo Summer Olympics scheduled to begin on July 23.

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Baseball’s Unwritten Rules reared their uninterpretable and oftentimes ugly head last week.

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Last month, the NCAA Board of Governors voted to extend President Mark Emmert’s contract through Dec. 31, 2025. The vote was unanimous, which means the entire board — consisting of mostly college presidents from all three divisions — approved of the reign of incompetence Emmert’s presidency has exemplified.

Like the teams they represent, MLB’s labor pool is populated by the haves and have nots, and we don’t mean talent.

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Last month the NFL announced new media deals with CBS, Fox, NBC, ESPN/ABC and Amazon that will net the league $113 billion over 11 years, or $321 million a year per team.

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For anyone who wondered why the NCAA refers to its annual basketball tournament as “March Madness,” they now have an answer.

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University of Kansas football coach Les Miles lost his job last week for repeated sexual misconduct during his time at Louisiana State University. UK Athletic Director Jeff Long, who hired Miles, was ushered out the door two days later.

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, most college athletic programs find themselves with declining revenues and increasing expenses. The efforts to address the financial squeeze, which includes the elimination of sports, has led to cries for faculty and students to be included in athletic department decisions.

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As the entire sports world knows, the GOAT, aka Tom Brady, became the only player in history to win seven Super Bowl rings when his new team, the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, beat the Kansas City Chiefs on Feb. 7. The win sparked a discussion about whether Tampa Bay can claim the moniker of Titletown USA.

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Capologists rule the world, at least the world of professional sports.

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A long-awaited change to athlete NIL rights, which appeared to be on the cusp of approval, will have to wait a bit longer.

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In November, when Theo Epstein stepped down as president of Baseball Operations for the Cubs, he took the opportunity to opine on the state of the game. He prefaced his remarks by saying baseball is the greatest game in the world (true), and then added an indictment....

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Growing up in Bangor, Maine, I was aware of the Penobscot Indian Reservation located 12 miles from our home. Louis Sockalexis, who was an outfielder for the Cleveland Spiders between 1897-99, was born on the reservation ...

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It’s the holiday time of year. Thanksgiving is behind us, and Christmas and Hanukkah will soon be here. And another annual tradition is about to be played out.

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Ben Stanley was enjoying both his basketball career and academics as a sophomore at Hampton University last spring. He planned to spend his junior year on campus before declaring for the NBA draft in 2021.

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Global consulting firm McKinsey & Company touts itself as “the trusted advisor and counselor to many of the world’s most influential businesses and institutions.”

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In case you missed it, two of the power five football conferences, representing the biggest college football programs in the country, decided to take a hiatus from competition this season.

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On his first day in office in 2015, MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred began to implement his vision for what has become known as “One Baseball.”

By Jordan Kobritz, Syndicated Columnist September 17, 2020
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Unless you’ve been quarantined without access to the news for the past eight months you know 2020 has been the year of change. Nothing exemplifies that more than the about face taken by the NCAA regarding playing sports when students aren’t on campus.

Talk about confusion. Mere days after announcing their 2020 schedule, two of the power five conferences in FBS football shut the door on a season. The other three conferences? Not a chance…yet.

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Should sporting events be open to fans? The answer depends on who you ask.

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“We’ll never change the name. It’s that simple. NEVER—you can use caps.”

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The passage of time hasn’t diminished their pain — physical, mental, emotional. They are reminded of it with each passing day that USA Gymnastics (USAG) and its former apologists and supporters remain unpunished.

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For anyone anticipating the return of baseball next month, here’s a bit of advice: Don’t hold your breath. After three months of excruciating back and forth failed to result in an agreement between owners and players, MLB commissioner Rob Manfred mandated a 60-game season beginning on July 23.

Americans love their college football, as evidenced by the fact so many of us can’t imagine life without it.

Baseball fans are hoping the sport returns to the field this year, but optimism is dwindling by the day.

MLB teams are in cost-cutting mode, which is understandable given the economic conditions surrounding the game during the strangest summer in the sport’s history.

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought financial devastation to all sectors of our economy, including academia, but it’s business as usual in collegiate athletic departments around the country.

In professional sports, disputes between owners and players over money come with the territory. But the current bickering between MLB and the Players’ Association over how much players should be paid in a truncated 2020 season sets a new low for greed and selfishness.

Major League Baseball will reportedly reduce next month’s amateur draft to five rounds, a significant reduction from last year’s 40. The decision will have short- and long-term consequences to the game, most of them bad.

Professional sports are facing an uncertain future in 2020. Will they begin or resume play? If so, where and when will the games be held? Will fans be allowed to attend?

With the majority of Americans sheltering at home amid the global coronavirus pandemic, it may be difficult to envision attending a live sports event any time soon.

Give MLB props for trying. The league and players’ union are bandying about a number of ideas in an effort to salvage some semblance of a 2020 season.

With all the tragic and devastating news of late, we shouldn’t lose sight of the good things that are being done in our country, including those that occur in the sports world.

In 1984, Thomas Boswell, one of the most gifted baseball writers of all time, published a collection of essays titled, “Why Time Begins on Opening Day.” The book was an instant classic.

The financial fallout from cancelled or postponed sporting events due to the coronavirus will be significant. Leagues, teams, athletes and NGO’s (non-government sports organizations) will lose hundreds-of-millions of dollars, perhaps into the billions, before the games resume.

Welcome to a world with virtually no live sports.

The gates were padlocked and everybody except players, team personnel, employees, scouts and media, was barred from entering the stadium during the game being played in Joe Riley Stadium.

It’s the story that won’t die. The Houston Astros sign-stealing scandal has been written about, analyzed and debated for months, with no end in sight.

MLB is discussing ways to shake up the playoffs and some of the proposals are right out of left field.

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