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Thu, July 18

Staff Member

Jordan Kobritz, Syndicated Columnist
Syndicated columnist

Jordan Kobritz is a former attorney, CPA, and Minor League Baseball team owner. He is a professor and the chair of the Sport Management Department at SUNY Cortland. Jordan maintains the blog: http://sportsbeyondthelines.com and can be reached at jordan.kobritz@cortland.edu.

Recent Stories

To get what it wants, the NCAA resorts to threats and intimidation.

We have reached a new nadir in the era of political correctness. A number of NBA players insist that team owners no longer refer to themselves as “owners” because the word is racially insensitive and offends them.

Two stadiums in two countries, playing half a season in one and half in the other. Sound strange? Improbable? Impossible?

“There is always some kid who may be seeing me for the first or last time, I owe him my best.” Joe DiMaggio.

Any time officials are the main topic of conversation after an athletic event, it’s not a good look for the sport. Unfortunately, that was the case throughout the National Hockey League’s Stanley Cup Playoffs.

Major League Baseball instituted a reverse-order draft in 1965, severely limiting the negotiating leverage of amateur players. That may soon change.

Major League Baseball’s total revenue has been steadily rising since the strike year of 1994 and until three years ago, the same was true of the league’s attendance. That may no longer be the case.

Larry Nassar, the former doctor for Michigan State University and USA Gymnastics, is rotting in prison for sexually abusing over 300 girls and women during a 30-year period.

Mention college sports and people think of scholarships, intense recruiting, and professional opportunities. That’s certainly the norm for sports like football and basketball.

Every world class athlete has certain biological and physical advantages that sets them apart from “normal folks.” As examples, most basketball players are taller than average and most baseball pitchers have large hands.

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