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John Gunby Sr., Courier Columnist

Stories by John

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We are continuing our series on slow play and how to play golf in a timely manner.

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We are continuing our series on slow play and how to play golf in a timely manner.

We are in a time of our lives where we are witnessing riots, violence and total disrespect for others, authority and property. Let’s not have any of this, with tempers flaring out of control, anywhere on or around the golf course. Golf should be a fun and safe haven for us all.

Playing golf with your spouse can be fulfilling. The dream is to do something together with your spouse that enhances your relationship.

G.O.L.F. Or, great opportunities, lifetime friends. Let’s discuss the first part of this acronym, “great opportunities.” Let’s replace “challenge” with “opportunity.”

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They call the wind “Mariah” and sometimes use more colorful words! Spring is almost here and the paramount weather challenge we face at this time of year is the wind.

Golf is a game and a game provides diversion of attention from our everyday life. We all need a respite from our 24/7 focus on Coronavirus and playing golf is a great way to be safe with social distancing and provide yourself with recreational relief.

I don’t mean to be crude, but I do my best thinking on the toilet and in the shower. Some of you think I should flush my ideas down the toilet! But bear with me and my ADHD as I try to put on paper an idea for the future for learning the game of golf.

This is a great time to focus on your aim and alignment. Most mishits result from improper aim or alignment. Let’s be clear on a few things. Aim involves the clubface and your target.

By John Gunby Sr., Courier Columnist February 26, 2020

The USGA just came out with their Distance Insights Report. Anyone who has played this game for forty years or more, realizes that distance is so much more a factor. Face it – the further your shots travel, especially off the tee, the easier it is to score lower.

By John Gunby Sr., Courier Columnist February 12, 2020

Balance, rhythm, tempo and timing are crucial to any golf swing. You cannot be taught these fundamentals, but you can learn them.

By John Gunby Sr., Courier Columnist January 29, 2020

Last year we saw the modernization of the Rules of Golf. This year amateur golfers will see some changes in their handicap system, with the advent of the new World Golf Handicap System.

By John Gunby Sr., Courier Columnist January 15, 2020
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Being the second day of the New Year, many of us have already broken one or more of our resolutions. Here are some (not all) golf resolutions that I think all of us could keep, every day of the year.

We have previously discussed some Christmas gift ideas for golfers, mainly adults. Let’s explore how you can give a child a present that lasts a lifetime and will be one of the most beneficial gifts you will ever give them as a parent or coach or mentor.

By John Gunby Sr., Courier Columnist December 18, 2019

With only nineteen more shopping days until Christmas, I would like to discuss what a golfer might or might not need and want. That way, Santa can bring the best gifts this year that your favorite golfer (or you) will appreciate.

By John Gunby Sr., Courier Columnist December 4, 2019

It looks like we are mostly done with our warm days and now we face some weather challenges, especially if we love to live here and don’t want to travel to play golf in warmer temperatures (and higher greens fees).

By John Gunby Sr., Courier Columnist November 20, 2019

May I be frank with you? Or Wayne, or Chuck, or Roger? Seriously, we all have an ego. You would love to hit that little golf ball farther than you do.

By John Gunby Sr., Courier Columnist November 6, 2019

Most of us learned the traditional method of chipping. I was a very good chipper when I practiced and played a lot. But in the golf management business, I rarely had time to practice or play. And my chipping skills suffered.

By John Gunby Sr., Courier Columnist October 23, 2019

All learning encompasses three main learning styles. Visual, auditory and kinesthetic. A person will have a dominant style with the other two taking a backseat to their preference. Nowadays, the most prevalent style is, by far, visual.

I have seen many boyfriends, girlfriends, spouses, friends and parents doing their best, with great intentions, to teach those they care about how to play golf.

By John Gunby Sr., Courier Columnist September 11, 2019

This is the third of a series to assist you with putting. We will discuss different types of strokes and how to get the most out of your practice putting sessions.

Putting is not a physical science, it is a mental art. Everybody tries to get too technical when it comes to putting. They put way too much emphasis on the mechanics.

A putt, even from two inches, counts the same as a booming 300-yard drive. The easiest area of our game (and score) to improve upon is putting.

We discussed playing in the wind and now we are in our monsoon season, which means playing in soft, wet conditions. I will share some things that I think are important to playing your best during this time of year.

Watching the NCAA Golf Championships (Men & Women) as well as the PGA and LPGA Tours’ events, it is mind-boggling how slow the governing entities allow their players to play golf.

Playing golf with your spouse can be fulfilling. The dream is to do something together with your spouse that enhances your relationship.

The way we make sense (or non-sense) of incoming data is through our senses. Those five senses are: Visual (seeing); Auditory (hearing); Kinesthetic (tactile touch); Smell and Taste. In the realm of golf, the first three are of concern.

Spend a few hours observing a “driving range” or what should be appropriately called a “practice area.” Just watch. You will see friends coaching friends, spouses teaching spouses, parents instructing children – and you hear the regurgitation (another name for this is vomit) of myths that have perpetrated golf for a long time.

The Masters Invitational at Augusta National Golf Club is being held this week. I want to share with you some history and interesting tidbits regarding the first golf major of the year.

Spring has sprung and one of the challenges we face at this time of year is the wind. And in Prescott, the wind blows a lot.

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It was great to see the Tour players honoring Arnold Palmer this past week at the Arnold Palmer Invitational.

The new USGA Rules of Golf have been in effect for two months and there has been some consternation, discussions and changes. Watching some of the golf telecasts and listening to some of the commentators reinforces my laughable definition of an “expert” as a “person a long way from home.”

By John Gunby Sr., Courier Columnist February 28, 2019

Happy Valentine’s Day. A nice dinner, roses, candy, perfume, jewelry – all are to show your love for another. A day where many do their best to be the most romantic person to the person they love, a lofty goal given our exposure to soap operas, advertisements, tv and movies.

By John Gunby Sr., Courier Columnist February 13, 2019

We will continue our discussion with winter practice suggestions to include aim, alignment, hold and release. This is a great time to focus on your aim and alignment.

By John Gunby Sr., Courier Columnist January 30, 2019

We will continue our discussion with winter practice suggestions to get the most out of your golf game during inclement weather days.

By John Gunby Sr., Courier Columnist January 16, 2019

We are in the midst of our cold-weather golf season. In the next few columns, we will discuss what I suggest to get the most out of the days when we cannot play. In the winter, even if it is cold outside and the course is closed, you can develop better mechanics and improve your golf game without striking a single ball.

As we prepare for the new 2019 Rules of Golf, I want to discuss four rules with you. The first one, I consider a negative, while the last three, if enforced by the PGA and LPGA Tours will, I am sure, lead to their improved pace of play.

By John Gunby Sr., Courier Columnist December 5, 2018

In 2019, there will be a new procedure for dropping a ball. Your ball must be let go from knee height and fall through the air without touching any part of your body or equipment before it hits the ground.

By John Gunby Sr., Courier Columnist November 25, 2018

I am strongly suggesting that all golf clubs and courses get to work right now on marking their golf courses, having new Rule Books available, educating their players and developing their local rules to coincide with the new Rules of Golf that go in effect on January 1st.

By John Gunby Sr., Courier Columnist November 7, 2018

Some of the 2019 rule changes are going to have a huge impact on the course ratings and handicaps, especially if some local rules are implemented (i.e. out of bounds relief option, pace of play, etc.) and dependent on how the golf course is marked (i.e. out of bounds, red penalty areas, yellow penalty areas, no play zones, etc.).

By John Gunby Sr., Courier Columnist October 24, 2018
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The R&A and USGA have made some big changes to the Rules of Golf, beginning in 2019. These changes are intended to modernize the game and speed up the pace of play.

By John Gunby Sr., Courier Columnist October 10, 2018

I ran across a newly published book that encompasses the entire history of golf, “Born on the Links: A Concise History of Golf,” written by John Williamson.

By John Gunby Sr., Courier Columnist September 26, 2018

I think we all can agree that we play golf because it is a challenge and a never-ending quest for some common goals. Some of the common goals that I hear a lot from students is that they want to be consistent, hit the ball farther, improve their accuracy, and have fun.

By John Gunby Sr., Courier Columnist September 12, 2018
Tease photo

This is the third of a series to assist you with putting. We will discuss different types of strokes and how to get the most out of your practice putting sessions.

Tease photo

Putting is not a physical science, it is a mental art. Everybody tries to get too technical when it comes to putting. They put way too much emphasis on the mechanics.

A putt, even from two inches, counts the same as a booming 300-yard drive. The easiest area of our game (and score) to improve upon is putting.

Tease photo

We discussed playing in the wind and now we are in our monsoon season, which means playing in soft, wet conditions. I will share some things that I think are important to playing your best during this time of year.

One of the weather challenges we face playing golf is the wind. And in Prescott, the wind blows a lot. Almost all golfers dread playing in the wind as it really plays havoc with their game.

Begin reading the green and lining up your putt as soon as you reach the green. Don’t wait until it’s your turn to putt to start the process of reading the green.

We are continuing our series on slow play and how to play golf in a timely manner.

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