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2:36 PM Mon, Nov. 19th
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Barbie Doll Better Reflects Diversity

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Since Mattel released the first African American doll in 1980 it has created hundreds of Barbie dolls in various skin tones and from cultures around the world. (Photo by Vivian Meza/Cronkite News)

By: Vivian Meza

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This doll from 2000 comes from the Dolls of the World - Princess Collection. Mattel releasesd dolls that reflect the cultures and fashions of countries from around the world. (Photo by Vivian Meza/Cronkite News)

By: Vivian Meza

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Pilot Amelia Earhart was one of three historical figures included in Mattel’s Inspring Women line. The company says it plans to expand the collection. (Photo by Vivian Meza/Cronkite News).

By: Vivian Meza

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Pabboo Redfeather, an artist and Barbie collector whose mother is a member of the Blackfeet Nation, modified the clothesto reflect his heritage. (Photo by Vivian Meza/Cronkite News)

By: Vivian Meza

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Collectors and designers of the iconic Barbie doll spend hours buidling dioramas and accessories for their dolls, inspired bypersonal experiences, fashion and culture.(Photo by Vivian Meza/Cronkite News)

By: Vivian Meza

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Earlier this year, Mattel released the Inspiring Women line, which featured a Katherine Johnson doll. Johnson, a mathematician memorialized in the book and movie Hidden Figures, ihelped in some of NASA’s first manned spaceflights. (Photo by Vivian Meza/Cronkite News)

By: Vivian Meza

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Mattel’s Inspring Women line, released earlier this year, featured famed Mexican artist Frida Kahlo. Some criticized it as erasing Kahlo's unibrow. (Photo by Vivian Meza)

By: Vivian Meza

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Pabboo Redfeather, a designer and artist, says he has been collecting Barbies since he was 5 and started a Black Barbie club in 1980. (Photo by Vivian Meza/Cronkite News)

By: Vivian Meza

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Before the feminist movements in the 1960s, the eyes on Barbie dolls, like this one, demurely pointed downward. Mattel changed it so that the dolls could look forward to reflect changing attitudes towards women. (Photo by Vivian Meza/Cronkite News)