Experts: US Court fractures decades of Native American law

President Joe Biden hands a pen to Interior Secretary Deb Haaland after signing an executive order to help improve public safety and justice for Native Americans during a Tribal Nations Summit during Native American Heritage Month, Nov. 15, 2021, in Washington. With the President from left are first lady Jill Biden, Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas, Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra, Attorney General Merrick Garland and Interior Secretary Deb Haaland. A U.S. Supreme Court ruling expanding state authority to prosecute some crimes on Native American land is upending decades of law in support of tribal sovereignty. (Evan Vucci/AP, File)

President Joe Biden hands a pen to Interior Secretary Deb Haaland after signing an executive order to help improve public safety and justice for Native Americans during a Tribal Nations Summit during Native American Heritage Month, Nov. 15, 2021, in Washington. With the President from left are first lady Jill Biden, Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas, Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra, Attorney General Merrick Garland and Interior Secretary Deb Haaland. A U.S. Supreme Court ruling expanding state authority to prosecute some crimes on Native American land is upending decades of law in support of tribal sovereignty. (Evan Vucci/AP, File)

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