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Sat, April 04

Editorial: Keeping perspective during coronavirus pandemic

President Donald Trump speaks in an address to the nation from the Oval Office at the White House about the coronavirus Wednesday, March, 11, 2020, in Washington. (Doug Mills/The New York Times via AP, Pool)

President Donald Trump speaks in an address to the nation from the Oval Office at the White House about the coronavirus Wednesday, March, 11, 2020, in Washington. (Doug Mills/The New York Times via AP, Pool)

A Facebook post circulating on the internet offered a perspective many of us should consider while dealing with our unfortunate daily reality of cancellations, postponements and the complete up-in-the-air status of our lives right now because of the coronavirus pandemic.

The post from Rhonda Abbott Blevins of Clearwater Beach, Florida, received nearly 2,000 shares in less than 48 hours. It reads:

“Today I was driving when an ambulance came speeding up from behind, siren blaring and lights flashing. I pulled my car over and stopped as did the other drivers in order to allow the ambulance to pass unhindered. I didn’t stop or inconvenience myself for my own health – I stopped for the health of the one being tended by the EMTs.

“That’s what healthy folks are being asked to do during this pandemic. On a large scale we ‘pull over.’ We stop our progress. We do this for the benefit of the vulnerable among us, and for the healthcare workers who care for them.

“Those of us who aren’t considered senior adults and who aren’t dealing with medical issues that place us at greater risk of complications from COVID-19 must be ready to stop our normal lives for a while. We do this out of compassion. We are or will soon be asked to make changes. We will do so for the greater good.

“Stay safe, friends. Be well. Take care of each other. And if you have to pull over for a little while, get the well-deserved rest you need.”

As President Donald Trump declared a national emergency Friday morning, freeing up $50 billion in federal resources to combat the coronavirus, our lives as we know it are changing, and change is hard.

We must persevere, but while doing so, we must show compassion and understanding for those affected by this illness the most. We must do what we can to come together as a community, and stop the spread of this deadly disease.

If that means staying home when you’re sick even though people at work may be depending on you, so be it.

If that means not getting angry and causing a panic just because schools haven’t closed yet, try to be understanding. The people in charge of making those decisions are doing the very best possible job they can while keeping in mind everyone’s safety.

If that means heading to Walmart to buy toilet paper and there isn’t a roll in the entire store, don’t take it out on the nearest employee, it is not their fault.

If it means spring break travel plans fell through, or the annual “March Madness” that is the NCAA basketball tournament is unable to be enjoyed, or the family spring training baseball game outing is canceled, understand that it is for the best.

If your plans to attend that popular concert or event you’ve looked forward to for months are torn up like another draft of that finals paper in high school you dreaded, remember, there will always be another piece of paper.

As Rhonda’s post suggests, stay safe, take care of each other, including your friends, family and neighbors. Wash your hands often, keep yourself informed on the latest coronavirus news not only nationally, but right here in Yavapai County.

And remember, the night is darkest before the dawn. You might have to just pull over.

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