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Earp portrays Doc Holliday Oct. 17 at Phippen Museum

Wyatt Earp, great-nephew of the famous Old West deputy sheriff of Pima County, will recount a unique story in the life of the West’s most famous dentist, Doc Holliday, and explore his journey from healer to killer at the Phippen Museum’s Third Thursday dinner program taking place at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 17, at the museum, 4701 Highway 89.

Wyatt Earp, great-nephew of the famous Old West deputy sheriff of Pima County, will recount a unique story in the life of the West’s most famous dentist, Doc Holliday, and explore his journey from healer to killer at the Phippen Museum’s Third Thursday dinner program taking place at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 17, at the museum, 4701 Highway 89.

Wyatt Earp will recount a unique story in the life of the West’s most famous dentist, Doc Holliday, and explore his journey from healer to killer at the Phippen Museum’s Third Thursday dinner program taking place at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 17, at the museum, 4701 Highway 89.

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Doc Holliday the Old West's most famous dentist who became a killer, will be the subject of a presentation by Wyatt Earp, descendant of the famous Old West Deputy Sheriff, at the Phiippen Museum at 5:30 p.m. Thursday Oct. 17

The setting is a Denver jail cell where Bat Masterson and Colorado Governor Fredrick W. Pitkin have placed Doc in protective custody for a few hours. Out of boredom and frustration, Doc has begun bantering with the other incarcerated prisoners. Throughout the presentation, you’ll hear the story of a man, who, as he puts it, went from “one who heals to one who keals.”

The Old West gambler best known for being the deputy sheriff in Pima County who shot and killed three outlaw cowboys at Tombstone’s O.K. Corral in 1879 wore many other hats, traveling from Kansas to Alaska seeking his fortune. According to his descendants, he was a misunderstood man. 

Named after his great uncle, the present-day Earp continues to reenact his famous relative’s life in a series of bio-dramas that he and his wife, Terry, have performed throughout North America.

A delicious dinner provided by Big Daddy E’s Smokin’ Barbecue accompanies this fascinating program. Doors open at 5:15 p.m. The cost is $25 for museum members and $30 for guests. These popular Third Thursday dinner programs require a reservation; call 928-778-1385 for your reservation. 

Information provided by the Phippen Museum.

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