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Phippen Museum brings Western art show downtown
Multiple mediums on display; show continues Sunday-Monday

Marie Barbera has her bronze artwork at the Phippen Western Art Show & Sale Saturday, May 25. in on the Courthouse Plaza in Prescott. (Les Stukenberg/Courier)

Marie Barbera has her bronze artwork at the Phippen Western Art Show & Sale Saturday, May 25. in on the Courthouse Plaza in Prescott. (Les Stukenberg/Courier)

Numerous Western artists showed off and sold their artwork in downtown Prescott on Saturday, May 25, for the first day of the Phippen Museum’s 45th annual Western Art Show & Sale.

At the show for the first time was Monna Kay, who said she works with oils but uses them thin enough to look like watercolor. Kay said she found out about the show after looking on the internet for show dates and figured she could do it.

She said she has been creating Western art for several years, having started painting after spending time photographing horses.

“I liked capturing action and I like cowboy life, the clothes and the colors,” Kay said. “I like to paint and draw horses.”

Choctaw artist Karen Clarkson was there with her artwork as well. Having been coming to the show for about 10 years, one of Clarkson’s paintings was called “Raven Mind Travel” and played with dimensions, having a smaller section of canvas sit on top of the main piece. It was something she had never done before, she said.

“I think what happened is I did a small one and I thought ‘you know what? I like this guy so much I need to make him bigger,’ ” Clarkson said. “This kind of came into being.”

Showing off her bronze work was Kim Seyesnem Obrzut who said she has been working in bronze for more than three decades and has had a presence at the show off and on for about 12 years.

Obrzut said her grandfather was a Kachina carver and that her own work is based on their Hopi culture. The pieces are contemporary but also have a traditional feeling to them, she said.

Wood carver and sculptor Russell Parker came back to the show for his second year and said he had a good time last year. Having been a wood carver for about six years, Parker turns the wood into Native American faces.

“The Native American faces have a lot of character. I just love them,” he said. “We live in the Southwest and I love that history.”

The Phippen Museum’s 45th annual Western Art Show & Sale continues at 9 a.m. Sunday and Monday, May 26-27 at courthouse plaza. The weekend’s second Quick Draw challenge takes place at 2 p.m. Sunday.

For more information, visit www.www.phippenmuseum.org.

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