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Mon, Oct. 21

Is sea rise wrecking coastal home values?
The answer: Maybe

In this Feb. 15, 2019 photo, real estate agent Tom Saab stands on a oceanfront deck at a condo he developed in Salisbury, Mass. Academic researchers say concerns over rising sea levels and increased flooding are having subtle but significant impacts on coastal property values, finding that climate change concerns have sapped more than $15 billion in appreciation from homes along the Eastern Seaboard and Gulf Coast. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

In this Feb. 15, 2019 photo, real estate agent Tom Saab stands on a oceanfront deck at a condo he developed in Salisbury, Mass. Academic researchers say concerns over rising sea levels and increased flooding are having subtle but significant impacts on coastal property values, finding that climate change concerns have sapped more than $15 billion in appreciation from homes along the Eastern Seaboard and Gulf Coast. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

SALISBURY, Mass. — For sale: waterfront property with sweeping views of the Atlantic Ocean. Waves erode beach regularly. Flooding gets worse every year. Saltwater damage to lawn.

Asking price: anyone’s guess.

Some research suggests rising sea levels and flooding brought by global warming are harming coastal property values. But other climate scientists note shortcomings in the studies, and real estate experts say they simply haven’t seen any ebb in demand for coastal homes.

So how much homeowners and communities should worry — and how much they should invest in remedies — remains an open question.

Nancy Meehan, 71, is considering putting her coastal condo in Salisbury up for sale, but she worries buyers will be turned off by the winter storms that churn the seas beside the summer resort town. Her home has been largely spared in the nearly 20 years she’s lived there, she said, but the flooding appears to be worsening along roads and lower properties.

“All my life savings is in my home,” Meehan said of the four-bedroom, two-bathroom condo, which she bought for $135,000. “I can’t lose that equity.”

Nearby, Denis Champagne can’t be sure that rising seas are hurting his waterfront home’s value. The three-story, four-bedroom home has views of a scenic marsh, has been renovated and is blocks from the ocean — yet was assessed at only around $420,000.

“Do I feel that it should be worth more than that?” Champagne said recently in his sun-soaked living room. “I mean, I’m biased, but where can you find this for that price — anywhere?”

A drop in home values could shatter a community like Salisbury, which relies almost exclusively on beachfront real estate taxes to fund schools, police and other basic services, researchers warn. And, they say, families could face financial ruin if they’ve been banking on their home’s value to help foot the bill for pricey college tuitions or even retirement.

“People are looking at losing tens of thousands of dollars of relative value on their homes,” said Jeremy Porter, a data scientist for the First Street Foundation, which describes itself as a “not-for-profit organization of digitally-driven advocates for sea level rise solutions” on its Facebook page. “Not everyone can sustain that.”

Still, home prices in coastal cities have been rising faster than those of their landlocked counterparts since 2010, according to data provided by the National Association of Realtors.

And waterfront homes are still generally more expensive than their peers just one block inland, said Lawrence Yun, the association’s chief economist.

“The price differential is still there,” he said.

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