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Wed, April 24

Prescott Valley in Brief: Prescott Valley Police recruitment open house March 19

Offering cookies to Haley Ramos, right, sixth-grader at Mountain View Elementary School, at the Youth Art Month reception March 6 at the Prescott Valley Civic Center are JTED students Emily Bristol, left, Bradshaw Mountain High School senior, and Brittany Yogerst, BMHS junior. March is Youth Art Month; the public is invited to view students’ creations during business hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays at the Civic Center, and in the library during its open times, Monday through Thursday 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Fridays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; and Sundays 1 to 5 p.m. (Sue Tone/Tribune)

Offering cookies to Haley Ramos, right, sixth-grader at Mountain View Elementary School, at the Youth Art Month reception March 6 at the Prescott Valley Civic Center are JTED students Emily Bristol, left, Bradshaw Mountain High School senior, and Brittany Yogerst, BMHS junior. March is Youth Art Month; the public is invited to view students’ creations during business hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays at the Civic Center, and in the library during its open times, Monday through Thursday 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Fridays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; and Sundays 1 to 5 p.m. (Sue Tone/Tribune)

Prescott Valley Police recruitment open house March 19

The Prescott Valley Police Department invites the public to attend its recruitment open house on Tuesday, March 19, from 5 to 7 p.m., at the Prescott Valley Police station, 7601 E. Skoog Blvd.

This event is open to all citizens who have an interest in applying to become a police officer for the Town of Prescott Valley. The open house will be an open forum for all potential applicants to ask questions they may have about the hiring process, and also a chance to meet with officers and the background investigators for the department. Police will also supply the printed forms needed in the application process during the event and will have a notary present to sign the documents for any applicant.

Prescott Valley Police encourages you to attend the event in preparation of the March 23 new officer testing. This open house will act as a great opportunity to ask any questions about the department and prepare for future testing dates.

If you cannot attend the event and wish to apply online, the application for PVPD can be found at www.pvaz.net/229/employment.

Information provided by the Prescott Valley Police Department.

Coping, addiction workshop set for April 6

Coping Skills, Addiction Workshop Series: Boundaries is slated for April 6, from noon to 2 p.m., at the Prescott Valley Public Library, 7401 E. Skoog Blvd., Prescott Valley.

This program is specifically designed for parents and spouses of addicted loved ones. Registration is required at pvlib.net. Call 928-759-3040.

Call for foster grandparents; training provided

Seniors 55 and older are needed immediately as volunteers to join the “Army of Angels” in the Foster Grandparent or RSVP programs working closely with local non-profit partner agencies.

As a foster grandparent, volunteers visit schools as a mentor and tutor for children and youth who will benefit from extra attention, according to a news release. Be part of a dedicated group of volunteers who are supported by a local coordinator. Share your time, life experiences and wisdom to help change the future for a child.

Training is provided and, if you are accepted as a foster grandparent, in addition to receiving a stipend and mileage reimbursement, you are eligible for additional benefits.

For information, call Darlene at the Northern Arizona University, Civic Service Institute, at 928-499-8018.

Learn about ancient Southwestern Native American pottery April 11

The Prescott Valley Public Library, 7401 E. Skoog Blvd., and AZ Speaks presents Ancient Southwestern Native American Pottery on Thursday, April 11, from 6 to 7 p.m.

Archaeologist Allen Dart will talk about how archaeologists use pottery for dating archaeological sites and interpreting ancient lifeways. He will discuss the importance of context in archaeology, such as how things people make change in style over time and how different styles are useful in identifying different cultures and dating archaeological sites.

His many illustrations include examples of ancient pottery types made throughout the American Southwest from about 2,000 to 500 years ago.

Diversity convention at Yavapai College on March 22

Members of the community are invited to be a part this year’s National Student Leadership Diversity Convention by attending its local representative counterpart at Yavapai College’s Prescott campus on Friday, March 22, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., in Building 3, Room 119.

The NSLDC is the largest national gathering of student leaders and campus-based advisors to address the most critical topics of diversity and social justice challenging academic campuses today. Join the Yavapai district’s local conference to learn more via experiential workshops, keynote sessions, and roundtable discussions relating to the various elements of diversity and how they affect students and campuses.

“The skills taught at the NSLDC open up the definition of diversity beyond skin color or nationality,” Yavapai College Student Leadership Council Vice President Carissa Bond said. “‘Diversity’ is also manifested as differences in age, thought and innovation, and ethics and morals. The NSLDC activities help students and community members become strong inclusive leaders by teaching them applicable skills to develop cultural dexterity, connecting them across a multitude of different backgrounds and focuses to create learning or working environments that value every individual for their unique contributions, allowing them to achieve their highest potential.”

To learn more about the convention and to register, please visit www.yc.edu/diversity.

Information provided by Yavapai College.

Historical Society plans old-fashioned picnic May 4

The Dewey-Humboldt Historical Society now has tickets on sale for the Kevin Leonard Memorial Old Fashioned Miners Picnic, which is set for 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, May 4.

The event, with food, music, games, and a chance to win a gold nugget, takes place at 9955 E. Newtown Ave., Dewey.

Tickets are $15, kids 12 and younger get in free. Tickets are available at Gifts and Games on Main Street, Humboldt, by sending a check to Dewey-Humboldt Historical Society, P.O. Box 85, Humboldt, AZ 86329, or through the dhhmuseum.org website. For information, call 928-499-9972.

Town accepting applications for commission, board

ARTS AND CULTURE COMMISSION

This commission serves in an advisory capacity to the Town Council on matters pertaining to the visual and performing arts and culture within Prescott Valley. It is a volunteer position by appointment of the Town Council, requiring some experience and knowledge of the arts and culture. This is a physical commission that requires lifting, bending and the ability to set up and tear down events. First priority for membership is given to those who live and reside within the Prescott Valley town limits; however, persons residing outside of the town limits who are uniquely qualified for membership may be considered for appointment.

LIBRARY BOARD OF TRUSTEES

This is a volunteer position by appointment of the Town Council. This position requires general knowledge of library operations, policies and procedures. Those appointed must live and reside within the Prescott Valley town limits.

Applications are available in the Executive Management Office, on the 4th floor of the Civic Center at 7501 E. Civic Circle, Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.

Little Free Library celebrates literacy

Little Free Libraries are a global phenomenon. The small, front‐yard book exchanges number more than 75,000 around the world in 85 countries, from Iceland to Tasmania to Pakistan. Now, a new Little Free Library at 3130 N. Cedar Springs Lane, Prescott Valley, will join the movement to share books, bring people together and create communities of readers.

“Our Little Free Library doesn’t just belong to us, it belongs to the whole city,” says Sarah Nilsson. “It’s our hope that this Little Free Library will bring a little more joy, a little more connection and a whole lot more books to our community.”

The Little Free Library nonprofit organization has been honored by the Library of Congress, the National Book Foundation, and the American Library Association, and Reader’s Digest named them one of the “50 Surprising Things We Love about America.”

EPA meeting now set for March 13

The Environmental Protection Agency rescheduled its Dewey-Humboldt Community Environmental Board meeting to 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 13, at the Dewey-Humboldt Town Library.

It had originally been set for Jan. 29 and was postponed until after the federal government resumed normal service.

The public is invited to the meeting, which will include updates on the Iron King Mine and Humboldt Smelter Superfund Site, and Project Harvest and Voices Unheard projects through the University of Arizona.

The board will discuss several potential speakers for upcoming meetings. These include John Peterson, Arizona Department of Environmental Quality Superfund Program; Brian Beck on recent work on the Superfund site; Dewey-Humboldt Historical Society; Grey Wolf Landfill representative; Jeff Schalau, University of Arizona Cooperative Extension on well water testing; Len Marinaccio, Sustainable Alliance; Cecil N. on “Ready Set Go” emergency information network program; and local watershed/environmental groups.

Learn about ancient culture on March 14

A free event through AZ Speaks called “The River People’s Landscape” will take place from 6 to 7 p.m. Thursday, March 14, in the Prescott Valley Public Library Crystal Room. Registration is required at pvlib.net/Attend/Classes. Space is limited.

The presentation will describe the historical landscape of the desert people, plants, river and surrounding mountains. Elders described everyday activity as “the way of life,” which included chores and work in the fields. Seasonal storytelling, harvesting and making of baskets, bows, and arrows also will be discussed.

For more information, call 928-759-3040.

Democratic Women offer scholarships

The Democratic Women of the Prescott Area (DWPA) plans to award three high school college-bound seniors a $1,000 scholarship each. This year the same application will be used to award both general and DACA scholarships.

Applications will be provided to all high school counselors in the Prescott area, including in the Prescott Valley and Chino Valley city limits. To be eligible, the high school student must be applying or has been accepted to a college or university, be a registered Democrat or reside in a home where one parent or a guardian grandparent are registered Democrats. (This does not apply to DACA students.)

The senior will also need to provide a completed application, reproducible picture, two letters of recommendation as well as a complete a one-page, double-spaced essay on, “How I Would Change the World.”

Graduating seniors are encouraged to pick up an application in their high school counselor’s office or they may contact the DWPA at info@demwomenprescottaz.com for an application to be emailed. Applications must be postmarked or hand delivered by Friday, March 29, to qualify.

Applications must be postmarked or hand delivered by Friday, March 29, 2019 to qualify.

Prep academy seeks tool donations

Canyon View Preparatory Academy is seeking tool donations for its industrial technology program. Donations of woodworking tools, metalworking tools, and scrap metal can be dropped off at the school at 9030 E. Florentine, Prescott Valley.

For drop-off times, call 928-775-5115 between 8 a.m. and 3 p.m. If you want to donate to the shop program, but are not able to deliver these tools, the school may be able to pick some items up after hours. Canyon View Preparatory Academy is nonprofit 501(c)3. Donations are deductible under Arizona State Tax Credit.

$2.5M in scholarships available through site

The Arizona Community Foundation’s online scholarship portal is now accepting applications, making scholarship funding opportunities available to students across Arizona for the 2019-20 school year.

As Arizona’s largest private provider of scholarship funding, ACF provides access to more than 100 scholarship awards with a single online application, a news release states. Completing one general application matches applicants with scholarship opportunities within the system for which they may be eligible.

High school seniors, current college students, or graduate students attending accredited schools anywhere in the United States may apply. Scholarships are available for two- and four-year colleges and universities, as well as vocational and technical schools. Application deadlines for scholarships vary, ranging from early spring to the end of May. Students are encouraged to apply early to maximize their opportunities for scholarship awards.

The awards available serve a diversity of students. Some scholarships are given based on merit or financial need, while others are awarded to students in a particular geographic region or with specific demographic characteristics. Visit www.azfoundation.org/scholarships to access over $2.5 million in scholarship awards and to find out more about scholarships available through ACF.

Since inception, ACF and its affiliates have awarded more than $719 million in grants, scholarships and loans to nonprofit organizations, schools, and government agencies. More information is available at www.azfoundation.org.

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