Trusted local news leader for Prescott area communities since 1882
Wed, June 19

School board approves change to calculations for valedictorian, salutatorian
Goes into effect for class of 2021

Chino Valley High School graduated 153 students on May 22, 2019. The Chino Valley school board has approved changes to the calculations for valedictorian and salutatorian. (Les Stukenberg/Review)

Chino Valley High School graduated 153 students on May 22, 2019. The Chino Valley school board has approved changes to the calculations for valedictorian and salutatorian. (Les Stukenberg/Review)

The calculations for valedictorian and salutatorian are changing and will go into effect for the graduating class of 2021 after approval by the Chino Valley Unified School District Governing Board at its meeting Tuesday, June 4.

It will start with the top 10% of the class and from there use a weighted GPA, which would count only for dual enrollment and honors level courses, Counselor Ivette D’Angelo said. Those courses are English, math, social studies and science.

“The weighted GPA would only be used for valedictorian/salutatorian,” she said. “It’s not going to be something you’re going to see on the transcript.”

They also have to complete the graduation requirements of four credits of English, four credits of math starting with Algebra One, three lab sciences and three social studies, D’Angelo said. They can get some of those credits by taking Yavapai College classes concurrently, but will count only if Chino Valley High School pays for it to make it an even playing field.

The classes have to be done by the end of the fall semester of their senior year and the student has to be at Chino Valley High School for at least one year.

These changes have been coming, something that was clearly stated in the student handbook, Chino Valley Unified School District Superintendent John Scholl said. The reason for the change is because the calculation that’s being used right now is incredibly complex, D’Angelo said.

The new system alleviates the students not knowing what they need to do to be valedictorian and removes the perceived lack of transparency, Scholl said.

Before the formula was written 10 or 12 years ago, there were times when there would be 12 valedictorians and one year saw a student who had a 4.0 but didn’t take any challenging classes, Scholl said.

Since valedictorian is supposed to be an indication of rigor, the principal at the time came up with a calculation and gave all college classes credit, he said.

“At the time we offered English and math,” Scholl said, noting that now students can take classes in courses such as welding, automotive and culinary arts.

“There’s all these opportunities now we didn’t have. That really came about when CTED was formed 10 years ago.”

Contact
Most Read

This Week's Circulars

To view money-saving ads...