Trusted local news leader for Prescott area communities since 1882
Thu, Dec. 12

Prescott Valley wants peddlers in town to be licensed
Violators of ordinance can face legal troubles, including arrest

Peddlers in Prescott Valley must have a peddler’s license. The peddler must carry the license with them when conducting business, and show it to police and potential customers upon request. Peddlers who visit a home and can’t produce a license can be cited for violating the code. Violators can face legal troubles, including arrest. (Stock art)

Peddlers in Prescott Valley must have a peddler’s license. The peddler must carry the license with them when conducting business, and show it to police and potential customers upon request. Peddlers who visit a home and can’t produce a license can be cited for violating the code. Violators can face legal troubles, including arrest. (Stock art)

Related Story

Prescott also keeps a strict ordinance under Title 4-4, which states, in part, that “it is unlawful for any peddler or solicitor to make exclusive use of any location to any street, alley, sidewalk or right-of-way for the purpose of selling, delivering or exhibiting goods or merchandise.”

See: Peddlers in Prescott also face strict rules

In June, as summer approached, Prescott Valley police reported they had cited and released two peddlers for wandering around the Quailwood and StoneRidge subdivisions without the town’s permission.

Prescott Valley Community Service Officer Jerry Ferguson said at the time that police had warned the pair for violating the town’s peddler ordinance.

So, what exactly is a peddler, you ask?

The Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines a peddler as “one who offers merchandise (such as fresh produce) for sale along the street or from door to door” or “one who deals in or promotes something intangible (such as a personal asset or idea).”

Those who want to become peddlers in Prescott Valley, however, first must apply for and receive a license.

LICENSE REQUIRED

Article 8-01 of Prescott Valley’s town code states that for “any peddler, solicitor or transient merchant” to sell and deliver one’s goods, wares or merchandise door-to-door, place-to-place or street-to-street within Prescott Valley’s incorporated areas, he or she must obtain a license.

Prescott Valley keeps peddler’s license application forms at the town clerk’s office, 7501 E. Skoog Blvd., Room 216, and online at pvaz.net.

A peddler’s license, which is valid for one year and isn’t renewable, costs $20 and includes a photo of the licensed individual. The application requires each would-be peddler to submit a government-issued photo ID, such as a driver’s license, and pay a $5 fee.

The peddler must carry the license when conducting business. When peddlers’ licenses expire, the person must complete a new application and pay another fee to get a new license.

Town code dictates that peddlers must show their licenses to police and potential customers upon request. Peddlers who visit a home and can’t produce a license can be cited for violating the code.

Ferguson said he initially issues warnings to violators of the peddler’s ordinance. If peddlers don’t cooperate subsequently, they can be arrested.

The town’s records department tracks citations. A records department representative, who preferred not to be named, said if someone seeking a peddler’s license is found to have an arrest record after a background check, that person won’t receive a license.

If the police chief determines an applicant doesn’t need a fingerprint check, the chief will endorse or reject the applicant within three days (72 hours), per town code.

From March through June, the records department rep said there were three peddler’s ordinance violators.

“Businesses like Dish and Direct TV must have a peddler’s license and a background check,” the rep added. “The [police] chief and the deputy chief sign off [on the licenses].”

EXEMPTIONS

In Prescott Valley, representatives of religious and/or charitable organizations don’t need a peddler’s license, provided they file a sworn affidavit with the town clerk.

The affidavit includes a tax-exempt number for each organization; a name and purpose for the permit; names and addresses of the organization’s officers; the location, date and hours of operation for the activity; and whether any commission or fee is charged during the solicitation. The amount of the commission or fee also must be noted.

MORE INFO

For more information about peddler’s licenses in Prescott Valley, call the town clerk’s office at 928-759-3135 or send an email to: clerk@pvaz.net.

Prescott Valley police encourage residents to report anyone who’s selling something door-to-door without a license. Call 928-772-9267 to report an incident.

Related Stories

Contact
Event Calendar
Event Calendar link
Submit Event

This Week's Circulars

To view money-saving ads...