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Tue, Oct. 22

Bradshaw to offer another opportunity for students – Army JROTC
Program will begin in August

Bradshaw Mountain High School Principal Kort Miner, right, explains the proposed Army JROTC program to the Humboldt Unified School District Governing Board at the April 9 board meeting, as Army Lt. Col. David Elder looks on. The board unanimously approved the program to being in August. (Sue Tone/Tribune)

Bradshaw Mountain High School Principal Kort Miner, right, explains the proposed Army JROTC program to the Humboldt Unified School District Governing Board at the April 9 board meeting, as Army Lt. Col. David Elder looks on. The board unanimously approved the program to being in August. (Sue Tone/Tribune)

Already, 196 students at Bradshaw Mountain High School have expressed an interest in participating in an Army Junior ROTC program. Now they can make plans for the 2019-20 school year.

The Humboldt Unified School District Governing Board on April 9 unanimously approved the program to begin in August.

Presented as another pathway leading from school to post-graduation opportunities, Bradshaw Principal Kort Miner said it also may retain students who would have chosen to attend another high school in order to participate in JROTC.

“We’ve lost students to Prescott High School,” Miner said. “This will keep the kids here, keep the kids local, and keep the kids attending Bradshaw Mountain High School.”

A recent survey of freshman, sophomores and juniors concludes that 196 students are interested in the program. Typically, about 50 percent will follow through on registration, Miner said in his packet information to the board, with about 70 to 80 students entering the first year of the program.

The U.S. Army will provide all supplies, uniforms, flags and rifles used by the Color Guard, and will pay one-half the JROTC instructors’ salaries. The program falls under the state guidelines as a Career Technical Education (CTE) course, and these funds will support the remainder of the cost.

HUSD’s CTE budget of $593,293 will help pay for a portable/modular building to house the program, including design, delivery, permit fees and installation, with an estimated cost of $341,854. CTE funds also will pay one-half of the two instructors’ salaries for the first two years of the program, about $60,000 per year.

By the third year, the district will be responsible for the cost of the salaries. The program will generate revenue by adding to the student enrollment numbers, HUSD Superintendent Dan Streeter said.

For each student registered in the program, the Joint Technical Education District (Mountain Institute) receives $1,000, Miner said. From that, the district collects 70 percent.

“It’s all about opening doors,” said Army Lt. Col. David Elder, who attended the meeting. “Some of the benefits of the program are that it allows students to have confidence to make decisions. From the Army JROTC, students can go into any branch of the military. It’s a definite leg up.”

Elder said his mission is not to funnel students into military service but to teach skills. One bonus of the program is the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery Test that not only offers students a look at what they are good at doing, but also into what fields in the military they can enter.

Board Vice President Rich Adler said a look at the curriculum dispelled some of his preconceived notions, and he supports the program.

“It does not preclude college, but for students with no interest in college, it could provide another pathway,” Adler said.

Board Member Suzie Roth, librarian at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, said she has watched the Air Force and Army ROTC programs there grow.

“It is absolutely a great opportunity for youth not sure where they will go after high school,” Roth said.

Miner echoed the numerous prospects open to BMHS students. “If you want to go to college, attend a university, enter the workforce, or join one of the military branches, Bradshaw Mountain High School is the school of choice in Yavapai County,” he said.

IN OTHER ACTION, the board approved:

• Title I Summer School for June 3-27.

• Hiring Clarinda Weatherwax as assistant principal of operations and resources and athletic director at Bradshaw Mountain High School.

• Hiring Charles Johnston as assistant principal at Liberty Traditional School.

Follow Sue Tone on Twitter @ToneNotes. Reach her at stone@prescottaz.com or 928-445-3333, ext. 2043.

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