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Tue, May 21

Chino school board gets first look at budget
Currently has raises planned, $160,000 cushion, superintendent says

The Chino Valley Unified School District Governing Board saw the proposed $12 million budget for the 2019-20 school year for the first time at its Tuesday, April 2 meeting. (Jason Wheeler/Review)

The Chino Valley Unified School District Governing Board saw the proposed $12 million budget for the 2019-20 school year for the first time at its Tuesday, April 2 meeting. (Jason Wheeler/Review)

The Chino Valley Unified School District Governing Board got its first look at the proposed $12 million budget for the 2019-20 school year at its meeting Tuesday, April 2.

Currently, it is expected that the number of students the district has this year will be the same next year, Superintendent John Scholl said.

“If we have more students, the revenue is going to go up. If we have fewer students, the revenue’s going to go down,” Scholl said. “We’re in current year funding, which means if we have fewer students we get less revenue. We may need to make mid-year, or earlier, changes to reflect that lower revenue.”

Further, with the weighted student count at 3,043 students coming to $4,195, the district is estimated to get about $185 more per student than it did this year, he said, adding that needs to go to pay for teacher raises, classified raises, insurance increases, administrator raises and retirement increases.

What is proposed for pay increases are a 5 percent raise for teachers, a 3 percent raise for therapists, a 3 percent raise for admins, and the expected $1 per hour raise that is coming in January for classified personnel.

The budget also shows a decrease in Teacher Experience Index, a measure of every teacher and how many years of experience they are given, he said.

“They add that all up and they compare that against the average in the state,” Scholl said. “If our average is higher, we get a TEI of above one. If our average is below, the TEI stops at one because that is the lowest amount that we can get.”

For the current year, the district’s TEI means getting about 1.62 percent more in the budget, and next year it went down to getting 9/100ths of 1 percent more, he said.

Some teaching positions are also going to be cut as a part of rightsizing some of the district’s grade levels, Scholl said.

As a whole, the budget puts the district at $160,000 in the positive, he said. That is a cushion for the next year on a $12 million budget.

“What that is indicating is if we don’t get the students in, and it’s hard to predict that now … we’ll be back and asking for some cuts,” he said. “Conversely, if we have more students, we can come back and ask for more staff.”

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