The Daily Courier Logo
Trusted local news leader for Prescott area communities since 1882
2:55 PM Fri, Oct. 19th

Prescott Powwow continues Sunday at Watson Lake

Photo by Sue Tone.

photo

Nizhoni Dinehdeal, 15, has her hair braided by Jessica Kota Saturday, Sept. 22, at the 12th Annual Prescott Powwow at Watson Lake. Nizhoni is a dancer residing in Glendale and Mesa, who is of Seminole, Otoe, Navajo, Kaw, Apache and Cree tribes. The Powwow continues through 3 p.m. Sunday and is free and open to the public; parking is $5. Photographs are not allowed during the Gourd Dance Ceremony at 10 a.m., but is allowed during the Grand Entry at noon. Visitors are requested to ask permission before taking photographs.

Traveling to Prescott’s Watson Lake from Sacaton for the 12th annual Prescott Powwow, are members of the New Moon family, dancers from the Ponca and Cheyenne Nation, here to support Head Woman Sue Sixkiller.

From left are Andrew New Moon, 12, the children’s grandmother, Babie New Moon, 8, and Shappachatan, 14. The children have been dancing since age 1 when they received their outfits and were brought into the circle.

Andrew is a grass dancer who blesses the ground. Shappachatan, whose name means Red Thunder Hawk, wears regalia decorated with hawks. They all carry eagle feathers and will be dancing Sunday, Sept. 23, the final day of the Powwow.

The Powwow is free and open to the public; parking is $5. Photographs are not allowed during the Gourd Dance Ceremony at 10 a.m., but is allowed during the Grand Entry at noon.