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10:18 AM Wed, Nov. 14th

Town looks for least expensive approach to industrial park development

New name for industrial park to be proposed to council

The Chino Valley Economic Development Subcommittee is looking at less expensive ways to approach starting what is now being proposed as the Chino Valley Regional Business Park, according to Economic Development Director John Coomer. (Review, file)

The Chino Valley Economic Development Subcommittee is looking at less expensive ways to approach starting what is now being proposed as the Chino Valley Regional Business Park, according to Economic Development Director John Coomer. (Review, file)

After being provided an estimate of about $23 million to make the entirety of the proposed industrial park shovel ready, the Chino Valley Economic Development Subcommittee is looking at less expensive ways to approach it, said Economic Development Director John Coomer following the Economic Development Subcommittee meeting Tuesday, Sept. 4.

“We’re not going to do the entire park to start,” Coomer said. “We are investigating, trying to figure out the least expensive way to approach the development of the business park.”

To pay for it, they are also looking into what is available in terms of private and public funding including grants, financing and private investors, he said. That may manifest itself in starting at Rodeo Drive or in that area at Jerome Junction where there’s already water and sewer infrastructure available — rather than starting at the eventual main entrance at Road 4 North — so there can be some sites and acreage ready to go without building up the whole park, Coomer said.

Further, after speaking with developers and people in the realm of economic development, they believe it would be beneficial to Chino Valley to build some pre-engineered steel buildings large enough to the average size building that companies are looking for so they can go in, modify them and be ready to go quickly, he said.

“My understanding is that the region, including Prescott, Prescott Valley, Dewey-Humboldt and Chino, has lost out on companies looking at the area and we didn’t have buildings that were suitable for them to modify for themselves so that lengthened their process and they wanted to be in, in six months to a year,” Coomer said. “They couldn’t do all of that in that time frame if they had to design a building as well.”

However, while the goal is to be able to have businesses come quickly, they don’t want to have something that doesn’t mesh well with Chino Valley, Town Manager Cecilia Grittman said in a previous Chino Valley Review article.

“We don’t want to take something that isn’t a good deal for us,” Grittman said.

“I’m hoping that we can say no to something that’s really dirty, really water intensive, not a good fit for us.”

A new name for the area is also going to be proposed for the Town Council to adopt, Coomer said. The proposed name is the Chino Valley Regional Business Park.

“We wanted the intention to be on Chino Valley,” he said. “We also wanted to focus on the fact that it’s a regional facility, not just Chino Valley.”

They will continue to use Old Home Manor as a moniker if needed, but since most people don’t know what Old Home Manor is, it’s going to be used as a descriptor instead of the name, Coomer said.