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Developer eyeing Dells-area project to hold open house May 8

In this 2017 file photo Matt Fay of Prescott Valley rides along the Peavine Trail on a stretch north of the Point of Rocks that is being eyed for residential development by Arizona Eco Development. Representatives from the company will hold an open house regarding their proposed development at 5 p.m. Tuesday, May 8, immediately after the City Council meeting in the Council Chambers, 201 S. Cortez St., Prescott. (Les Stukenberg/Courier file)

In this 2017 file photo Matt Fay of Prescott Valley rides along the Peavine Trail on a stretch north of the Point of Rocks that is being eyed for residential development by Arizona Eco Development. Representatives from the company will hold an open house regarding their proposed development at 5 p.m. Tuesday, May 8, immediately after the City Council meeting in the Council Chambers, 201 S. Cortez St., Prescott. (Les Stukenberg/Courier file)

Representatives from Arizona Eco Development will hold an open house regarding their proposed annexation and development in the City of Prescott near the Granite Dells.

This meeting is intended to present information and receive comments from the public, according to a news release. This is not a city-sponsored event, but the city is providing a public place where citizens can learn about the proposed plan and give feedback.

The meeting will be held at 5 p.m. Tuesday, May 8, immediately after the City Council meeting in the Council Chambers, 201 S. Cortez St., Prescott.

According to Courier archives, the project is proposed for near the Granite Dells’ iconic Point of Rocks, as well as along portions of the popular Peavine Trail — all as a part of the Arizona Eco Development project.

The project, which includes land north and south of the Granite Dells Parkway interchange on Highway 89A, is headed by Jason Gisi, CEO of Arizona Eco Development. He was not immediately available for comment.

The plans include a 3,850-home development that would include annexation of two parcels of land, totaling more than 3,000 acres, as well as a parcel that is already within city limits, according to Courier archives. The two parcels of land he is seeking for annexation are the north section, consisting of 2,190 acres near the Prescott Airport; and the Homestead annexation, consisting of 864 acres near the Point of Rocks (the mass of granite formations that borders the old Peavine railroad route, which is now a multi-use recreational trail).

Gisi previously told the Courier the bulk of the Point of Rocks would be preserved under the development plans. “On the major formations, there are zero plans to touch them,” he said, noting that the project would designate the area as open space, which would be preserved in perpetuity.

Developers also plan to dedicate 25 percent of total acreage to open space (complying with a city requirement), Gisi said, adding that the percentage is likely to increase as the planning moves forward.

The Point of Rocks is north of the scenic stretch of the Peavine that runs along the eastern side of Watson Lake. That section is owned largely by the city and is preserved, although development is expected on the previous Storm Ranch land, which is east of the trail and south of the Point of Rocks.

Homes already exist along the east side of the northern Peavine in The Dells project, which is located northeast of the Arizona Eco’s southern Homestead tract, the Courier archives state.

As for water, the Arizona Eco project is expected to use surface-water rights that the company already holds. Gisi said developers are proposing a swap of land-for-water with the city to cover about 20 percent of the need. Other water needs, which Gisi estimated would serve about 600 to 800 of Arizona Eco’s homes, is being proposed through a trade of 652 acres of land located at the northern end of the Prescott Airport’s runway.

Because the project consists of more than 250 acres, it must comply with the voter-approved Proposition 400 requirements, which call for a longer public review process and an economic impact study.

Gisi has estimated that “if everything goes seamless,” development could be underway by 2019.