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3:06 PM Mon, Nov. 12th

Navajo flutist, storyteller gives presentation at St. Luke’s

Michael Goodluck and biologist/naturalist Sue Daniel with flutes. (Courtesy)

Michael Goodluck and biologist/naturalist Sue Daniel with flutes. (Courtesy)

Navajo flutist and storyteller Michael Goodluck will be at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church on Saturday, Feb. 17, for a one-hour presentation titled “A Magical Journey.”

It is the second presentation in a series of programs, Building Bridges of Understanding, put on by the church’s Native American Ministry Committee, according to Monte Anderson, the church’s vestry liaison for outreach.

“We have ties with several people, and there is an Arizona (Ministry) of Native Americans,” Anderson said. “We have some special relationships with the Navajo. We also have a special relationship with the Yavapai-Apache Nation up in the Verde Valley. We made a mission statement, which is building bridges of understanding through learning, interacting, caring and participating.”

Goodluck has dedicated himself to fighting alcohol and drug abuse in the Navajo nation as a youth coordinator working with Fighting Back, Inc.

In a news release, Goodluck said he believes every person has a unique opportunity to make the world the best it can be, for themselves and for everyone.

He’s been crafting his own line of flutes for 25 years, and his musical performances accompany his stories.

Goodluck’s presentation -- one hour long, followed by 30 minutes of questions and answers -- is free and open to the public. It starts at 11 a.m. in St. Luke’s Episcopal Church Parish Hall, 2000 Shepherds Lane, Prescott.

Anderson said learning from Native Americans is the best way to learn about Native American culture.

“I think that people really want to know more,” he said. “And here we are, right next door to the Yavapai-Apache Nation. How many people really know anything about it? I think people are interested, and this is the best way to communicate this stuff.

“It’s important to know who these people are and to learn from them,” Anderson said. “We not only have learned from our Native American neighbors already, but we are doing things that really interact with them.”