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6:34 AM Tue, Dec. 11th

‘Keep this state red’ rally cry at Republican Women’s luncheon

Politics, religion the most important things to talk about, AZ Rep chairman says

Jonathan Lines, chair of the Arizona Republican Party, encourages members of the Republican Women of Prescott to “Keep Arizona red” at the group’s luncheon on Wednesday, Feb. 14, at the Prescott Resort. (Sue Tone/Courier)

Jonathan Lines, chair of the Arizona Republican Party, encourages members of the Republican Women of Prescott to “Keep Arizona red” at the group’s luncheon on Wednesday, Feb. 14, at the Prescott Resort. (Sue Tone/Courier)

“Why are you a Republican?” guest speaker Jonathan Lines, chair of the Arizona Republican Party, asked the audience at the Wednesday, Feb. 14, Republican Women of Prescott’s luncheon meeting, held at the Prescott Resort.

The responses reflected some popular themes -- for a better life, for freedom, for less government, for less taxes.

Lines, who hails from Yuma, encouraged Prescott Republicans to do “like the Democrats are doing.” That is, to meet with friends and neighbors, speak to them about local issues, and convince people to vote.

“Our responsibility is to work harder than they do,” Lines said.

His said that his first introduction to politics was at age nine, when his grandmother paid him to join her door-to-door campaign for Ronald Reagan. Once Lines had earned that first paycheck – $16 – his grandmother then explained to him why she took taxes out of his pay; this made Lines support Reagan even more, he recalled.

Lines and his wife, Rosalie, have 11 children, which often leads to questions from his constituents, he said.

“Politics and religion are the most important things to talk about,” he added, noting that he is Mormon (a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints).

Active in his community and family life, Lines is general manager and vice president of Lines and Lundgreen Roofing and Insulation, and is a partner in Tuscany Development.

He said he visits high schools to speak about the Republican Party, and he complained to those attending the luncheon: “They are not being taught well in school, are they?”

Lines also talked about spending time recently with President Donald Trump, talking about how to keep Arizona a red state. During the chat, the president told Lines, “You’re doing a helluva job for Arizona,” Lines said, adding that the president also advised him, “Be proud of Arizona” and heaped some praise on Lines, too, saying, “You’re doing what you’re supposed to do be doing,” Lines said at the luncheon.

Barbara Theil, who said she has been a member of RWOP for five years, also said that she appreciated the ideas and direction that Lines shared with the group, about how to expand into the community.

Terrie Baughn, who described herself as an “escapee” from California, also said that Lines’ presentation was valuable. “He talked to us like a local, but he was in the president’s office,” Baughn said. “He’s doing good work.”

In addition to the guest speaker, members heard from Yavapai County Supervisor Rowle Simmons and Yavapai County Sheriff Scott Mascher concerning the upcoming ballot measure to extend the jail tax. Susan Howe also addressed the group, with an update on Honor Flight Arizona, a nonprofit whose mission is to take Arizona’s veterans of WWII and/or the Korean War to see their memorials in Washington D.C., at no cost to the veteran.