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Tue, April 23

Library receives $2,000 Community Reads grant
PV residents invited to join in, learn about the Hotshots

Fernanda Santos is the author of “The Fire Line: The Story of the Granite Mountain Hotshots and One of the Deadliest Days in Americans Firefighting.”

Fernanda Santos is the author of “The Fire Line: The Story of the Granite Mountain Hotshots and One of the Deadliest Days in Americans Firefighting.”

In January, the Prescott Valley Public Library was awarded $2,000 for a Community Reads Grant through the Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records for a community reads series where the library encourages community members to read the same book.

The book chosen is “The Fire Line: The Story of the Granite Mountain Hotshots and One of the Deadliest Days in American Firefighting,” by Fernanda Santos. There will be programs related to the book beginning in May and running through June.

“Jennifer (Kim) and I wanted to propose a community reads program and this just fell right in,” said Adult Services Librarian Michele Hjorting, stating that in order to receive the grant, the book had to take place in Arizona or had to have an Arizona connection. “For us, this was perfect because it’s our community in addition to fitting the requirements.”

The kickoff event is from 10 to 11 a.m. on Saturday, May 20, where copies of Santos’ books will be raffled off, with the next event being from 6 to 8 p.m. on Friday, June 16, where Santos will lead a book discussion. Santos will return at a panel event alongside Deborah Pfingston, mother of Andrew Ashcraft, and about four to eight others about the book from 1 to 3 p.m. on Saturday, June 17, and there will be a panel of about six people from 6 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, June 29, discussing the Hotshots memorial trail. Santos will be attending all of the programs, said Adult Services Librarian Jennifer Kim.

The library is trying to bring in people who have knowledge of the trail and who can talk more about it, said Hjorting of the second panel. Since it’s a difficult trail, it’s a way for people who may not be able to travel it to learn about it and have more information about how it came to be a state park, she said.

The events surrounding the book were are an important part of the community’s history, said Kim.

“There’s a lot of new people that are coming into the area that have heard about it, they don’t understand the full impact. The purpose of this grant was to support the goals of civic engagement, encourage reading and promote Arizona literature,” she said. “I think what we’re doing does all of that.”

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