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Sat, Sept. 21

Council to wade in on climate change
Prescott body to consider adopting resolution committing it to lowering greenhouse gases

Local residents participated in the national demonstration marching on behalf of science in downtown Prescott on Saturday, April 22. The national debate comes before the Prescott City Council on Tuesday, when they consider a climate change resolution.
Photo by Max Efrein.

Local residents participated in the national demonstration marching on behalf of science in downtown Prescott on Saturday, April 22. The national debate comes before the Prescott City Council on Tuesday, when they consider a climate change resolution.

About a month ago, the Prescott’s City Council received a petition requesting they accept the U.S. Mayors Climate Protection Agreement.

The council is set to consider the adoption of this agreement during its regular meeting this Tuesday, April 25, at 3 p.m.

The resolution establishes a policy to take cost-effective actions that benefit the community by reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Under the agreement, participating cities commit to take the following three actions:

• Strive to meet or beat the Kyoto Protocol targets in their own communities, through actions ranging from anti-sprawl land-use policies to urban forest restoration projects to public information campaigns;

• Urge their state governments, and the federal government, to enact policies and programs to meet or beat the greenhouse gas emission reduction target suggested for the United States in the Kyoto Protocol — 7 percent reduction from 1990 levels by 2012; and

• Urge the U.S. Congress to pass the bipartisan greenhouse gas reduction legislation, which would establish a national emission trading system

Several cities throughout the state, including Flagstaff, have already accepted the resolution.

The council will also listen to the first of two hearings on recommendations for 2017’s Community Development Block Grants (CDBG). This is done every year to develop an outline on how the available CDBG funds will be allocated.

The last item in the regular agenda is a public hearing for the alternative expenditure limit. Every municipality in Arizona is subject to a cap on how much it can spend each year, no matter the amount of money the municipality has.

This is the last hearing on this matter, so a vote will be held to determine the exact language that will go on the ballot for the public to vote on during a special election in late August.

If the alternative expenditure limit is not passed by voters, then the city will have to abide by the spending limit set by the state.

“Basically, it allows us to have local control if passed,” said City Clerk Dana DeLong.

Setting the spending cap is done every four years.

In the council’s study session, set to take place at 1 p.m., it will hear two presentations.

One will be on the Pavement Preservation Program, which is done yearly to review where the city is at with its pavement projects.

The other will address unit allocations of alternative water for residential development.

The recommendation is to lower the mandatory water allocations for both single-family and multi-family residential buildings to figures that more closely reflect the actual amounts used by them each year. This would loosen the water supply requirements for future housing developments.

No vote related to either of these presentations will take place at this meeting.

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