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Fri, May 24

Editorial: We want issues, not taco trucks or wanted posters

In this combination of file photos, Sen. John McCain, left, R-Ariz., speaks during a committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, and U.S. Rep. Ann Kirkpatrick answers a question during a Congressional District 1 debate with in Tucson. An Arizona Republican Party spokesman is defending the release of a wanted poster for Kirkpatrick, a Democrat challenging McCain in Arizona’s U.S. Senate race. Kirkpatrick’s campaign and former U.S. Rep. Gabby Giffords say the poster includes bullet holes and that it’s inappropriate imagery related to violence. State GOP spokesman Matt Specht disputes that the wanted poster depicts bullet holes and he says it’s just an old-fashioned weathered image from the Old West.
AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, left, Mike Christy/Arizona Daily Star via AP, Files

In this combination of file photos, Sen. John McCain, left, R-Ariz., speaks during a committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, and U.S. Rep. Ann Kirkpatrick answers a question during a Congressional District 1 debate with in Tucson. An Arizona Republican Party spokesman is defending the release of a wanted poster for Kirkpatrick, a Democrat challenging McCain in Arizona’s U.S. Senate race. Kirkpatrick’s campaign and former U.S. Rep. Gabby Giffords say the poster includes bullet holes and that it’s inappropriate imagery related to violence. State GOP spokesman Matt Specht disputes that the wanted poster depicts bullet holes and he says it’s just an old-fashioned weathered image from the Old West.

Just one day after a call for civility in elections, voters get blitzed by taco trucks and wanted posters.

A comment by a Hispanic Donald Trump supporter has shot around the country and even has its own hashtag on Twitter, “#tacotrucksoneverycorner.”

Latinos for Trump founder Marco Gutierrez said on MSNBC Thursday night that the Mexican culture is “dominant” and “imposing” before issuing his taco warning, as reported by the Associated Press.

He said that without Trump there could one day be “taco trucks on every corner” in the U.S.

Voters need to hear exactly what Trump wants to do about immigration, not the biggest gaff or comment of the day. And he needs to pick a stance and stay there.

Also this week saw the Arizona Republican Party under fire (no pun intended) after they released a western-themed “wanted poster” depicting Democratic U.S. Rep. Ann Kirkpatrick. She’s running against Sen. John McCain for the Senate.

The poster had what many consider tasteless bullet holes on it, in keeping with the theme. This upset quite a few people, including former U.S. Rep. Gabby Giffords, because they feel it touts violence.

Giffords and her husband, former astronaut Mark Kelly, said the GOP should apologize, according to the AP report.

“In a state and country that know the toll of gun violence too well, there is no room for invoking the use of firearms in our politics,” they said.

According to the AP story, “State Republican Party spokesman Matt Specht called the criticism an attempt to distract from the poster’s message that Kirkpatrick avoids public appearances in which she might be asked tough questions. Specht in a telephone interview Friday said that round splotches on the poster Kirkpatrick labeled as bullet holes were intended at conveying a weathered image of the Old West.”

“They could be just holes, whether it was something that was nailed to a tree or wall,” he said.

Was it in bad taste? Yes.

Can we move on? Please?

Each day is something else to detract voters – it’s almost the “shiny object” trick - and we are falling for it.

It’s up to individuals to look past these daily blasts of non-information and try to figure out what the candidates are all about.

Maybe we can get some real data on each of their plans during the much-anticipated debates.

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