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MLB No criminal charges filed in Schilling probe

In this May 16, 2012, file photo, former Arizona Diamondbacks pitcher Curt Schilling is followed by members of the media as he departs the Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation headquarters, in Providence, R.I.
Steven Senne/Associated Press, File

In this May 16, 2012, file photo, former Arizona Diamondbacks pitcher Curt Schilling is followed by members of the media as he departs the Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation headquarters, in Providence, R.I.

SCITUATE, R.I. — An investigation into former Arizona Diamondbacks pitcher Curt Schilling’s failed video game company, 38 Studios, has resulted in no criminal charges, authorities announced Friday.

The yearslong investigation found “no provable criminal violations” of state law, according to a report released by the state police and the state attorney general’s office. Attorney General Peter Kilmartin and state police Col. Steven G. O’Donnell said there was not enough evidence and probable cause to bring charges.

“At the end of the day, justice is getting the right result under the law, which is not necessarily the popular result,” Kilmartin said. “Bad politics, bad public policy, bad business decisions simply do not always rise to the level of criminal conduct.”

O’Donnell said there were many ways the 38 Studios deal was problematic, starting with the way lawmakers pushed through the legislation used to finance the deal, which he said was not transparent. He also said those involved in the deal didn’t do their due diligence, partly because of the state’s poor economy and Schilling’s celebrity status. But he said those factors were not enough to bring charges.

The former ballplayer’s company relocated to Rhode Island from Massachusetts in 2010 in exchange for a $75 million state loan guarantee. The company went bankrupt less than two years later, leaving taxpayers on the hook.

Schilling, a former Yavapai College pitcher, reacted on Twitter, telling WPRI-TV he was “disgusted” that authorities investigating the failed deal with his video game company were sent on a “witch hunt” and telling WPRO-AM that company executives “didn’t do anything wrong but fail at business.”

Schilling has said 38 Studios fully disclosed its financial condition to the state.

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