Trusted local news leader for Prescott area communities since 1882
Thu, April 25

Local police, residents react to Texas tragedy

A Dallas police officer, who did not want to be identified, takes a moment as she guards an intersection in the early morning after a shooting in downtown Dallas, Friday, July 8, 2016. At least two snipers opened fire on police officers during protests in Dallas on Thursday night; some of the officers were killed, police said.
Photo by Associated Press.

A Dallas police officer, who did not want to be identified, takes a moment as she guards an intersection in the early morning after a shooting in downtown Dallas, Friday, July 8, 2016. At least two snipers opened fire on police officers during protests in Dallas on Thursday night; some of the officers were killed, police said.

photo

Prescott Valley Police Chief Bryan Jarrell

PRESCOTT VALLEY – Police Chief Bryan Jarrell doesn’t understand what the attack on Dallas police was supposed to accomplish.

photo

Dan Pietrandoni, Retired police officer and fireman: “I’m a former firefighter and at one time was a police officer also and those people don’t get enough respect. I’d like to see more positive rhetoric for the people out there trying to keep the peace.”

“Families are destroyed, and a young man is also dead because he was consumed with hatred, hatred instead of determination to seek meaningful change, because the event that occurred in Dallas will not change anything,” he said.

photo

Grace Guisewite, Yavapai County Public Defender: “I just think everything has been tragic. The shootings of police. The police shooting black men. I think that gun violence is out of control. We have to figure out some way to stop those and I think it starts with respect for humanity.”

“So what was accomplished here except the destruction of more lives and the perpetuation of more hatred?”

Five officers were slain in the sniper attack, and seven more injured, when one or more gunmen opened fire on what had been a peaceful march in downtown Dallas to protest the deaths of Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and Philando Castile in suburban St. Paul, Minnesota.

photo

Ruth Rothgery, Prescott citizen: She heard over the radio that the Dallas police chief said the police exist to step between the bad guys and the victims. “Who’s going to step between the bad guy when the bad guy’s a cop and the victim is the man sitting in his car, like the man in Minneapolis. That cop, he’s not a bad guy? Even though he stuck his gun in the car and shot the man?”

Yavapai County Sheriff Scott Mascher said in a statement, “I, like many of you, am sick and tired of the violence against law enforcement officers who put their lives in harm’s way every day. These acts of evil must not be tolerated. Please pray for the families of the officers killed and wounded. Openness and transparency must be the priority in the discussion of officer involved shootings and these attacks on our fellow officers only set back any progress we have made.”

Jarrell said that the attack was pointless.

“Instead of letting the system of justice run the way it’s supposed to… does it always work out the way we want? No. But it’s the system of justice we have under the democracy we have. And if we don’t have that, then we end up back in a civil war, and we’re all fighting against each other.”

He also noted that it could happen anywhere, even here.

“All it takes, no matter how much this community loves our police officers, it only takes one person to have some sense of hatred or injustice … that they feel the only way they can address those grievances is through the use of violence against …my police officers.

“Just because we’re in Prescott Valley,” he said, “that doesn’t mean it can’t happen here.”

The attack in Dallas is a “reminder that people out there don’t like us, don’t like police officers, just simply because of the uniform we wear,” Prescott Deputy Police Chief Amy Bonney said.

photo

Michael Johnson, Prescott resident who lived in Dallas for three years before moving to here in 2009: “I moved here from Dallas. It’s kind of spooky. Dallas is a nice city. I liked living there. But there’s this little undercurrent of fanaticism there and I can’t quite put my finger on it.”

“The bottom line is, we still are entrusted to take care of this community, and we just do it the best way that we know how, trying to keep in mind the safety of our officers as well as that of the community.”

Contact

This Week's Circulars

To view money-saving ads...