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Body camera video: 'I don't want to hurt you, take the **** shot'

Video footage provided by YCSO<br>A screenshot from video taken from Yavapai County Sheriff Deputy Ethan Stover’s body cam. Deputy Stover fatally shot Arthur Bates Sept. 2 as Bates fired seemingly random gunshots in his Williamson Valley neighborhood.

Video footage provided by YCSO<br>A screenshot from video taken from Yavapai County Sheriff Deputy Ethan Stover’s body cam. Deputy Stover fatally shot Arthur Bates Sept. 2 as Bates fired seemingly random gunshots in his Williamson Valley neighborhood.

PRESCOTT - A Yavapai County Sheriff's deputy shouted orders to Arthur Bates, telling him to put down his gun at least nine times before the deputy finally shot and killed Bates, based on the deputy's body-worn camera video.

The sheriff's office on Thursday, Sept. 10, released the video showing the events leading up to the Sept. 2 shooting of a suspect authorities had said was firing shots, apparently randomly, in his neighborhood.

It was the first real-world incident captured by the cameras to be released by the sheriff's office.

Deputy Ethan Stover confronted Bates, 45, who was shooting from his front yard in the 4300 block of Marlow Drive in Williamson Valley.

A friend told dispatchers that Bates had called and said he wanted to commit suicide, spokesman Dwight D'Evelyn said.

Deputies tried to get Bates to drop the weapon, but he continued firing shots, D'Evelyn said, and "at one point in the negotiations, he walked directly toward deputies, still armed, and demanding they shoot him."

The online video shows deputies arriving and being told by dispatchers that Bates' wife is in the house. The deputies set about a plan to get her safely out of the house, asking her to walk out a back door toward them. The deputy wearing the camera, Stover, approaches the property with a rifle.

There's some confusion shown by deputies who are frustrated by what seem like conflicting instructions being given to his wife.

Suddenly, a shot is heard and Stover begins ordering Bates to put the gun down.

Another shot is heard and Stover continues talking to Bates, stopping to tell a partner, "I don't know what he's doing."

Just as he asks Bates to "talk to us," five more shots in rapid succession are heard, and the deputy begins to run toward him, shouting, "Stop right there!"

Stover tells Bates, "Let's work this out, man, come on."

He stands around a corner, with his rifle trained on Bates, who, due to the camera angle, is not visible. The deputy tells Bates at least nine times to put the gun down.

Bates can be heard saying, "The whole idea is, I don't want to hurt you, take the f------ shot...if I put the gun down you won't take the shot." He shoots twice more.

"Put it down, do not come any closer," Stover shouts one last time, just before firing a single shot from his rifle.

He runs over to Bates, who is on the ground.

"He was shooting everywhere," Stover says.

"He was shooting everywhere but toward us," another deputy says.

"Once he came around this corner here, I told him to 'Stop, stop,' and he wouldn't," Stover says.

Medics pronounced Bates dead at the scene.

The cameras went into service with many, but not all, deputies wearing them, the week of July 25.

Follow Scott Orr on Twitter @AZNewsguy. Call him at 928-445-3333 ext. 2038 or 928-642-7705.

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