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Reactions mixed at Prescott egg hunt

Matt Hinshaw/The Daily Courier<br /><br /><!-- 1upcrlf2 -->Atticus Nieto, 1 1/2, picks up an Easter egg while his dad Alberto looks on during The Great Prescott Easter Egg Hunt Saturday morning at the Courthouse Plaza in downtown Prescott.

Matt Hinshaw/The Daily Courier<br /><br /><!-- 1upcrlf2 -->Atticus Nieto, 1 1/2, picks up an Easter egg while his dad Alberto looks on during The Great Prescott Easter Egg Hunt Saturday morning at the Courthouse Plaza in downtown Prescott.

The Great Prescott Easter Egg Hunt was presented by Tim's Toyota Saturday, April 4, with two Family Easter Egg Hunts at noon and 2 p.m.

Reactions to the hunts were a bit mixed due to some restrictions focused on safety.

Twenty to 25 children were allowed out at a time to pick up eggs and the kids were only able to receive two eggs each. The event's announcer, Steve Gottlieb, said the reasoning behind the restrictions was safety.

"You don't want kids running into each other," he said. "Then you got an elbow and then a fight with a 2- and 10-year-old. Not fair."

Gottlieb said that the amount allowed out at a time helped maintain and rotate it while keeping it safe. He stated the event was about having fun and not going home with an injury.

However, many parents didn't like the restrictions. David Burgoyne said even though it gave everybody a chance, it was kind of "cheesy" after having stood in line for two hours and only getting two eggs for $5.

And some kids standing in line for the noon hunt didn't even get to enter.

Mike Faye said by the time he and his daughter got to the front of the line, the eggs were gone.

"They were out of eggs by that point," he said. "I know it's for charity and all that, which is great, but for $5 I figured they... would be able to get more eggs. They could have put more out after they were gone and let another group go. People stood in line for 45 minutes."

Gina Allen also didn't make it in with her daughter and said she probably wasn't going to wait for the 2 p.m. hunt because her daughter was getting tired.

"I heard a lot of kids crying that didn't get to get out there," she said, adding that she didn't know how else they could have done it. "I realize they're having a second one, but kids get tired."

It wasn't just the kids that didn't want to wait either. Carlos Jones said he didn't want to stand in line for another hour as well.

On the other hand, there were some parents who thought the restrictions were worth it.

Donna Hastings said it was a little unorganized, but said it was great, as did Mary Jo Magaw.

Gottlieb defended the restrictions, mentioning they have been done on egg hunts in major metropolitan areas like Los Angeles and Seattle.

"We didn't invent it, we just looked at all the Easter Egg hunts across the U.S. and saw the best, safest way to do this," he said.

The downtown event, a year in the making, also featured storytelling by Pregrine, improv performances by the Prescott High drama club and homemade carnival games.

Volunteers from Chapter 5 and the Northern Arizona Recovery Association have spent the last two weeks stuffing assorted chocolates and other candies into the 7,000 plastic eggs that will be put out for the hunt.

There were 1,000 hard-boiled eggs, donated by Hickman's and colored by the congregation of First Baptist Church.

Follow Jason on Twitter @PrescottWheels.

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