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Trusted local news leader for Prescott area communities since 1882
12:36 PM Sat, Sept. 22nd

Wrigley's rooftop owners are the ones spoiling the view

Paul Beaty/The Associated Press<br>In this May 14, 2013 file photo, a view from the upper deck stands at Wrigley Field shows the rooftop bleachers outside the right field wall along Sheffield Avenue across the street. The owners of the Chicago Cubs say they’re moving forward with plans to renovate and expand Wrigley Field, despite the threat of lawsuits by the owners of the adjacent rooftop venues overlooking the 100-year-old ballpark.

Paul Beaty/The Associated Press<br>In this May 14, 2013 file photo, a view from the upper deck stands at Wrigley Field shows the rooftop bleachers outside the right field wall along Sheffield Avenue across the street. The owners of the Chicago Cubs say they’re moving forward with plans to renovate and expand Wrigley Field, despite the threat of lawsuits by the owners of the adjacent rooftop venues overlooking the 100-year-old ballpark.

Warning: the following is a closed-door support meeting for pitiful followers of the pitiful Chicago Cubs. If you don't know the password, you cannot come in.

You're right; the password is 'playoffless.'

If you've been living above a rock this spring, you've been missing out on the collision course that controversial Wrigley Field renovations are having with awful baseball. Although under new ownership, the Cubs organization is contractually bound with the rooftop owners across the street when it comes to Wrigley Field and her dungarees.

Cubs ownership wants to install a big left-field scoreboard in the shiny ballpark celebrating its 100th birthday this year. Rooftop owners are saying nerts on that because of its impact on them and because they have a court-appointed say in the matter, and now lawyers are heavily involved.

As ugly as that sounds, it gets worse on the field. The Cubs have gone 20 innings (and counting) without scoring a run. They're unanimously the worst team in baseball.

I love Wrigley. I learned to love baseball there as a kid. But the rooftop owners are wrong.

Their greed is holding millions of other fans hostage. What's ironic is that when the remodel happens and the team starts winning, the rooftops will become way more profitable than the ones now with an unobstructed view of a half-empty ballpark sporting such bad ball that fans don't even want to go into much less watch from across the street.

The rooftop owners need to stand down on this one.

Because the Cubs will start winning. They will. They might. It's somewhat possible. It's not likely. Probably not. No chance. Holy mackerel how bad can this get.

***

Some terms in sports ring very special.

Stoppage time. Game Seven. Unsuited connectors.

'Single-admission doubleheader' is another.

On Saturday the Diamondbacks and Mets played a single-admission doubleheader. I can tell you that single-admission doubleheaders are beautiful things.

I went to one in the mid-80s. Astros at Cubs. With my dad, sitting second row over the Cubs dugout. I watched Jose Cruz round third base on a home run to right field that won it for Houston to finish up what was the left of the previous day's game. That was great enough. And then, another game!

You can see some great baseball in a single-admission doubleheader.

Anyone else ever been to one? (post below)