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Mon, June 17

NCAA is morally bankrupt; now they can afford to pay student-athletes

Wilfredo Lee/The Associated Press<br>
Miami head coach Al Golden, second from left, watches a drill during team practice on Tuesday in Coral Gables, Fla. Miami's football team will lose nine scholarships and the men's basketball team will lose three, as part of the penalties the school was handed Tuesday by the NCAA as the Nevin Shapiro scandal presumably drew to a close.

Wilfredo Lee/The Associated Press<br> Miami head coach Al Golden, second from left, watches a drill during team practice on Tuesday in Coral Gables, Fla. Miami's football team will lose nine scholarships and the men's basketball team will lose three, as part of the penalties the school was handed Tuesday by the NCAA as the Nevin Shapiro scandal presumably drew to a close.

One thing is certain about the NCAA's absurd "punishment" handed down Tuesday for the University of Miami football program's transgressions.

The NCAA is utterly disingenuous, wholly hypocritical, and is completely void of any high ground from which to enact enforcement over college programs.

We've officially witnessed the end of the NCAA governing body's relevant authority.

So, what's say we start the paperwork to get NCAA student-athletes paid. Let's start now, mmKay?

Who's gonna say 'no', the NCAA?

The age-old alibi that student-athletes already get what they deserve - a scholarship - and therefore aren't eligible for payment no longer even passes the giggle test.

It's right there, literally listed under Part I in the NCAA's summary of regulations specifically aimed at student-athletes under the heading "Ethical Conduct - All Sports."

"You must act with honesty and sportsmanship at all times," the NCAA laughingly spells out from its smoke-filled backroom, "so that you represent the honor and dignity of fair play and the generally recognized high standards associated with wholesome competitive sports."

(I'll wait a couple seconds as you clean your keyboard from your spit-take)

Amidst the 13 pages of NCAA BS relating to student-athlete eligibility is this precious nugget: "You are not eligible [bold emphasis added by the NCAA] in any sport if, because of your athletics ability, you were paid for work you did not perform."

I'm sorry, but doesn't that rule out the entire NCAA executive committee? [insert drum rimshot]

The NCAA is just plain sleazy. The Miami decision was the last piece of evidence for anyone still doubting the NCAA's sleazy intentions for its sleazy committee members and their sleazy forged allegiance to the ethics of higher education.

Everyone's favorite example, of course, is the Fiesta Bowl scandal from a couple years back. Illegal campaign contributions and personal piggy-bank spending by former Fiesta Bowl sleaze CEO John Junker summed up the lengths the NCAA goes to enforce its student-athlete policy of keeping money earned out of the wrong hands. The athletes.

Huh?

In August of this year, ESPN analyst Jay Bilas outed the NCAA sleaze merchants by revealing that the governing body actually sold merchandise with student-athletes' jersey numbers, even directing customers to online shops by typing in specific student-athletes' names, without playing those players one thin dime. Again, more evidence of the NCAA enforcing its student-athlete policy of keeping money earned out of the wrong hands. The athletes.

Wait, what?

Then came the farce of an investigation and its "penalty" for the University of Miami football program that came down Tuesday.

Unplug the hypocritical ATM for executive boards and academic institutions and start giving compensation to those who actually did the work for the revenue raised, and not those hiding behind a fraudulent respect for college education.

All opposed to paying student-athletes, raise your hand.

Except for the NCAA, you keep your hand down and your mouths closed.

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