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12:43 PM Sun, Sept. 23rd

Fire in Prescott dumpster caused by improperly disposed-of chemicals

Prescott Fire/Courtesy photo<br>
Prescott firefighters put out a fire in a dumpster caused by improperly disposed-of chemicals. A company from Phoenix that specializes in the disposal of hazardous waste picked up the bottles of chemicals.

Prescott Fire/Courtesy photo<br> Prescott firefighters put out a fire in a dumpster caused by improperly disposed-of chemicals. A company from Phoenix that specializes in the disposal of hazardous waste picked up the bottles of chemicals.

Prescott firefighters on Wednesday put out a fire in a dumpster caused by large bottles of highly concentrated acids and other reactive chemicals that were improperly disposed of.

A noon, Prescott Fire Engine 72 answered a call about a dumpster fire in the 500 block of North Hassayampa Drive and found smoke in a large roll-off dumpster outside a vacant home being renovated.

Firefighters quickly determined that the fire was caused by chemicals in the dumpster, and another engine, a battalion chief, and the hazardous materials response vehicle were called in, Prescott Firefighter/Paramedic Conrad Jackson said.

Hazardous materials technicians and consultant Steve Maslansky conducted air monitoring, sorted through the dumpster, removed trash, and isolated bottles of chemicals, including several large bottles of highly concentrated acids and other reactive agents.

The contractors overhauling the home called a company in Phoenix that specializes in the disposal of hazardous wastes to pick up and dispose of the chemicals, Jackson said.

Residents are reminded that dangerous chemicals such as strong acids should not be disposed of in the trash, Jackson said.

The City of Prescott annually sponsors a free hazardous materials disposal day in the fall, and residents are encouraged to use that time to dispose of

such items to avoid a potential hazardous spills, which could endanger others, in-cluding responding emergency personnel, Jackson said.