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6:43 PM Wed, Nov. 14th

Temple B'rith Shalom invites public to High Holy Days observances

Courtesy photo<br>Rabbi Jessica Rosenthal of Temple B’rith Shalom

Courtesy photo<br>Rabbi Jessica Rosenthal of Temple B’rith Shalom

Jewish people are preparing now for their High Holy Days - Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. Temple B'rith Shalom's observance begins with Selichot at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 31, and includes a film, refreshments and a service. Erev Rosh Hashanah is at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 4. The Rosh Hashanah morning service is at 10 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 5. Kol Nidre is at 7:30 p.m. is at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 13. The Yom Kippur morning service is at 10 a.m. on Saturday, Sept. 14, with an afternoon service at 3 p.m. Yizkor is at 4:45 p.m. and break the fast follows. Tickets are not required but donations are recommended and welcome.

The period of time from Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur is known as the 10 Days of Penitence.

It is "a time of reflection, prayer and apology if you have wronged and to accept apology from those who have wronged you," Rabbi Jessica Rosenthal of Temple B'rith Shalom said. "If you do this right, you will be inscribed in the Book of Life for another year.

"Rosh Hashana is also a very joyous holiday, celebrating the beginning of he new Jewish year," she said, and is often celebrated with symbolic sweetness of apples and honey.

Temple B'rith Shalom is part of the Jewish Reform Movement and the only synagogue between Prescott and Sedona and the greater Phoenix area.

The High Holy Days are the most important of the Jewish year, the rabbi said.

"This is a time of charity, repentance and prayer," added Bill Weiss, a member of the temple's congregation. "People make an extra effort to repent, be charitable and pray in preparation for the High Holy Days. It's a marvelous thing. This whole period is a unifying force among Jews. It affects Jews all over the world."

The shofar is integral to the High Holy Days. It is a ram's-horn trumpet used by ancient Jews in religious ceremonies and as a battle signal. Its sound is symbolically heard around the world during Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur.

"Everyone is welcome to come. We would love to have folks attend" the High Holy Day services, Rabbi Rosenthal said.

For more information, call the temple at 708-0018.