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Fri, May 24

2 donations will make 20 in Prescott Valley permanent sculpture collection

Velocipede Rider by Barbara Andress stands outside the north third floor entrance to the Prescott Valley Civic Center. The artist has offered the steel sculpture to the town’s permanent art collection.<br>
Trib Photo/Sue Tone

Velocipede Rider by Barbara Andress stands outside the north third floor entrance to the Prescott Valley Civic Center. The artist has offered the steel sculpture to the town’s permanent art collection.<br> Trib Photo/Sue Tone

Two artists have offered the Town of Prescott Valley their sculptures as part of the permanent Art at the Center collection. The Arts and Culture Commission administers the project, and its selection committee will make a recommendation to the Commission at the August meeting whether to approve the two pieces, after which the Commission will make a recommendation to the town council, and the council makes the final decision.

Barbara Andress' Velocipede Rider has been on display with the town since 2010. For most of the time, the steel cyclist and cycle sculpture, valued at $10,500, has stood outside the Civic Center's north third floor entrance (on a ledge to the east). Recently, Parks and Recreation workers moved it to a more prominent spot on the Civic Center grounds at the Lake Valley/Lakeshore intersection.

"Because it was a bicycle, it really spoke to the nearby multi-use path," said Brian Witty, Parks and Recreation director. Initially concerned about possible rust or vandalism, once Andress saw her sculpture's placement, she was "totally enthralled," Witty said. "But we knew we would be moving it back." Velocipede has returned to its position tucked outside the third floor entrance.

"The sculpture is a lady preparing to ride the velocipede, 'a bicycle that is still available, that was greatly in vogue at the turn of the century,'" Andress said. "There is a sense of merging our century with the past, in that ladies of the past were not always able or allowed to ride such bikes. Thus there is an element of today's liberated woman in this piece."

Cindy DeCecco's Coalescence, a copper sculpture valued at $4,000, now sits on the fourth floor of the Civic Center. For the past two years, visitors could walk past it on the first floor of the library near the elevators.

"The sculpture represents what feels like to serve our community," said DeCecco, professor of studio arts at Yavapai College. "Working in city government or teaching at a state school or college requires individuals to go through rigorous credentialing. What the individual later finds out is not so much that they have this great job, but the job has them. There is a dynamic connection between the two forms in the sculpture."

DeCecco said her gift of Coalescence was made in gratitude for the opportunity to teach at Yavapai College and serve the community.

The selection committee will determine whether to add one or both pieces to the town's permanent collection, asking themselves how the sculptures fit in the collection and where to place them.

"Some pieces are permanently placed, such as Limitless," Witty said, referring to the expansive brightly colored sculpture set in concrete to the east of the Civic Center. Others are located inside the library and around the Civic Center grounds. One sculpture, Comb Over, stands in George Andersen Park.

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