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Tue, March 19

Tribal cultural center, road plans progress

Matt Hinshaw/The Daily Courier<br>
A pickup truck drives past the future site of the Cultural Center below the Prescott Resort Friday afternoon. The Yavapai-Prescott Indian Tribe  is currently looking for a contractor to build the facility.

Matt Hinshaw/The Daily Courier<br> A pickup truck drives past the future site of the Cultural Center below the Prescott Resort Friday afternoon. The Yavapai-Prescott Indian Tribe is currently looking for a contractor to build the facility.

The Yavapai-Prescott Indian Tribe has hired a major architectural firm for its cultural center, and now is considering statements of qualifications from construction management firms.

And a new major road through the Yavapai-Prescott Indian Reservation could be open to the public as soon as June 1, tribal General Manager Jim Noe said.

The tribe just finished advertising for a construction management company to build a 44,000-square-foot Yavapai Indian Cultural Center below its Prescott Resort and Conference Center near the intersection of highways 69 and 89. Statements of qualifications were due Friday.

The building site has been leveled since 2006, and the tribe recently put up signs naming the road that accesses the site between the resort and Highway 89 "Cultural Center Road."

The tribe just hired the architectural firm SmithGroupJJR, Noe said. It's one of the largest architectural firms in the country, with one of its offices in Phoenix. Architect Magazine ranked it the second-best architectural firm in the country in 2011.

The firm's previous projects include the $46 million Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), the flagship building for the downtown Phoenix biomedical campus.

It probably will take about six to 12 months to have a final design for the cultural center, then maybe six to nine months for construction, Noe estimated.

The center could be ready to open in late 2013 or early 2014, he estimated.

The cultural center will feature a museum, cultural education center and indoor auditorium, Noe said.

The museum will be open to the public, and convenient for resort visitors. It will include a gift shop.

The cultural education center will include classroom and multi-purpose space where tribal members can learn about Yavapai-Prescott arts, traditions and language, Noe said.

Tribal connector

Commonly called the tribal connector, the as-yet-unnamed road will be the shortest way to get from Highway 89 to Highway 69 in Prescott since the Arizona Department of Transportation redesigned the 69/89 intersection in late 2009 and prevented drivers from turning left off Highway 89 onto Highway 69.

The road will connect to Highway 89 south of Prescott Lakes Parkway, running up to Highway 69 to an existing stoplight at Target in the tribe's Frontier Village shopping center.

The new road will have a gentler slope than Prescott Lakes Parkway.

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