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Students bury time capsule to be opened by Prescott High School's Class of 2062

Matt Hinshaw/The Daily Courier<br>
Students and teachers watch as Prescott High School Principal Totsy McCraley throws the first shovelful of dirt onto the Prescott Unified School District time capsule at PHS Wednesday afternoon.

Matt Hinshaw/The Daily Courier<br> Students and teachers watch as Prescott High School Principal Totsy McCraley throws the first shovelful of dirt onto the Prescott Unified School District time capsule at PHS Wednesday afternoon.

Fifteen students and teachers braved the cold, windy weather Wednesday afternoon as Prescott High School students buried a 5-foot-tall time capsule next to the roses in the roundabout at the school's entrance.

"This is an amazing project the students did," said Prescott High School Principal Totsy McCraley. "This was filled not just by Prescott High School students, but by elementary and middle-school students throughout the district. There's all sorts of stuff in there. I just hope in 50 years they can get it out of the ground, since it weighs 300 pounds."

The time capsule, signed by students, teachers, administrators, and board members, will be opened by Prescott High School students on Valentine's Day in 2062.

"The elementary students had never seen anything like it, and couldn't wait to put their art, toys and things inside and sign it," said Dylan Younger, a senior and Air Force JROTC member who, along with John Conolly, took the time capsule to each school in the district so students could put items inside it.

"The elementary students were really excited when the time capsule came to their schools," said Conolly, taking a break from shoveling dirt onto the time capsule. "Not a lot of them knew what a time capsule was."

The idea for the time capsule was presented by Air Force Reserves Col. Denny Peeples, who leads the Air Force JROTC at Prescott High School, said Courtney Snow, who teaches English and advises the student council at Prescott High School.

Student council members organized a schedule for the time capsule to go to each school in the district, and spoke to teachers about what to put in the time capsule, Snow said.

"The time capsule is filled with a lot of letters from kids about what they think they'll be doing 50 years from now," said Michelle Ritzer, who teaches science at PHS. "Some are from parents to their kids, and others are from kids to themselves. They even wrote, 'Please give it to this person if they aren't here when the time capsule is opened.'"

Snow said she briefly looked at her students' letters and was impressed by how introspective they were, the way they described their lives now, and what they thought their lives would be like in the future.

"We put in a T-shirt with the names of senior class students on it," said Kylee Irvine, a senior and student council member. "We also put in a valentine for the students who open it since the time capsule is supposed to be opened on Valentine's Day."

"An elementary student put in a penny, nickel, dime and a quarter to show what our change looks like now," Snow said. "PHS teams put in sports jerseys, the softball team signed a softball, and Coach Ray Reidburn, who has coached here for the past 25 years, wrote a letter to the future basketball coach and put in the JV playbook."

The yearbook club donated a 2010 centennial yearbook, the math club put in a graphing calculator, and students put in music they like to listen to, along with many more surprises for the students who open the time capsule 50 years from now, Snow said.