The Daily Courier Logo
Trusted local news leader for Prescott area communities since 1882
10:07 PM Thu, Nov. 15th

Prescott Valley motorcyclist critical but stable at burn unit

Colin MacDiarmid, the Prescott Valley motorcyclist seriously injured in a collision with an SUV last week, remains in critical but stable condition at the Maricopa Medical Center's Arizona Burn Center in Phoenix, said Sgt. Brandon Bonney, Prescott Valley Police Department spokesman.

MacDiarmid's sons, Ian and Colin, said their father will receive treatment at the burn center for quite some time as he recovers from third-degree burns over 60 percent of his body, a fractured pelvis, collarbone and fractures in both wrists.

"He has undergone two surgeries to remove burnt tissue and to prepare for eventual skin grafts," Ian and Colin wrote in a post on the website www.macdiarmid.us. "Because he is under heavy sedation, he is on a ventilator and is expected to remain that way for several weeks."

MacDiarmid cannot receive cards, flowers or many visitors because he is in the burn unit's intensive care unit and because of the severity of his injuries, his sons said. So they created the website to let people check on how MacDiarmid is doing, and encourage people to send him email messages at ccmacdiarmid@yahoo.com. They will read emails to him until he can read them himself.

"We cannot thank you enough for the tremendous support you have shown Dad this past week," Ian and Colin wrote in a website post. "It is comforting to know he has all of you supporting him and keeping him close in your thoughts and prayers. He will need this to help him through the next several months."

The Modified Motorcycle Association of Arizona (MMAA), of which MacDiarmid is an assistant district manager and board member, is asking people to call the American Red Cross at 1-800-733-2767 to donate blood in MacDiarmid's name, Larry Stroud, the MMAA's High Country district manager, said on Wednesday.

"That way Colin can get the blood he needs, but so will other people who are in need," Stroud said.

An American Red Cross blood drive is scheduled from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. today at the Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran Church, 1202 Green Lane in Prescott. People interested in donating should call 1-800-733-2767 to schedule an appointment.

"He's looking a lot better than we expected," said Stroud, who rode down to visit MacDiarmid early Wednesday.

The MMAA's High Country chapter is in the process of holding a group ride in MacDiarmid's honor, as well as a fundraiser at Smokey's Harley Steak House in Mayer with bands and a raffle, Stroud said.

"We want to thank all the individuals, especially outside of the motorcycle world, who have emailed and gotten involved to help Colin, because we really appreciate it," Stroud said.

The High Country chapter also has opened The Colin MacDiarmid Fund at Wells Fargo Bank. People can stop in any bank location and mention the account or go online and select his fund. All money in the account will be used to help pay Colin's bills during his recovery, Stroud said.

The day after the collision, MacDiarmid's pal Stony Monday said, "Colin is a hell of a good friend. He doesn't just feel it, he says it, and he shows it."

Neighbor Edward Klimack agreed.

"He is very helpful, a good man," Klimack said of MacDiarmid, who served on their HOA board for about two years. "He is a very good neighbor."

Last May, MacDiarmid, who had been an EMT and CPR instructor at Yavapai College in its emergency medical services program a couple years ago, took part in a ride to raise safety awareness for motorcyclists and car drivers sharing the road.

At the time, MacDiarmid said the ride was personal for him.

"A wonderful man in our community, Phil Siebenthaler, died on Highway 69 in Prescott Valley just a few months ago by someone who was allegedly unaware that his motorcycle was next to his truck," MacDiarmid told The Daily Courier in May of 2010. "When the truck changed lanes, Phil was run off the road."

MacDiarmid said then that he hoped that more drivers of cars and trucks will always use their turn signals and look, preferably twice, before making a turn, changing lanes, or pulling out onto the main roadway, to improve safety for motorcyclists and themselves.