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5:50 PM Sat, Dec. 15th

Students speak!: Elementary students say what Chino Valley needs

Jerry J. Herrmann/<br>The Daily Courier<br>Austin Horst and Cissy Gillo, members of Susan Romney's second/third-grade class at Mingus Springs Charter School, check out the class' book, "The Future of Chino Valley."

Jerry J. Herrmann/<br>The Daily Courier<br>Austin Horst and Cissy Gillo, members of Susan Romney's second/third-grade class at Mingus Springs Charter School, check out the class' book, "The Future of Chino Valley."

Chino Valley needs a hospital, museum, Super Wal-Mart, paved roads, and more, according to members of Susan Romney's second/third-grade class at Mingus Springs Charter School.

The students will give these ideas and others in a book to the Chino Valley Town Council at its 6 p.m. Thursday meeting at 1020 W. Palomino Road.

Romney said the book is the result of the students' studies on how residents participate in local government. As part of the class, each of her students was asked to write a letter to the council on an issue he or she felt would improve the community.

To help give the students some ideas for their letters, Romney had Chino Valley Mayor Jim Bunker speak to the class.

The students' letters, along with artwork illustrating them, were compiled in a book called "The Future of Chino Valley."

Romney said the students at Mingus Springs Charter School have been doing class books in the fall semester for the past six years. In the spring semester, she said they do a pioneer journal.

"These books give the students a sense of pride and strengthen their writing and other skills," she said. "In this case, all of the students knew what they wanted to make their community better."

Third-grader Samantha Haddox said the community needs a hospital. "If someone has a heart attack, they could get here quickly," she said.

Second-grader Hailey Maier agreed. She wrote, "If we don't have a hospital close by, people might die. (Also, they) might not see families because it is too far away."

According to second-grader Elizabeth Wright, Chino Valley needs a movie theater.

Second-grader Laine Miller urged the council to pave the roads because kids are always slipping on the rocks, and people gets lots of flat tires. Also, the dust from the dirt roads is bad for people with asthma, she said.

Third-grader Janie Sherratt wants a new park and playground because whenever she goes to the one across from the school, it is always crowded.

"A new park is needed so more families can get together. Parents can have a break and kids will have fun and more people will want to move here," she said.

Third-grader Garrett Thompson wants a Super Wal-Mart so people don't have to go to Prescott or Prescott Valley and waste gas. A Wal-Mart could also generate revenue for the town to build a zoo, playgrounds or more racetracks, he said.

Third-grader Blayde Mascarenas wants another skate park where there would be one side for big kids and one side for little kids.

Chino Valley needs a second football field, according to second-grader Brayden Low, "to help people get healthier."

"Have a second one (so) this one wouldn't be so crowded. More kids and adults could play football," he elaborated.

Third-grader John Hardy wants an enclosed sports arena to bring more people to Chino Valley. "People will take a bunch of vacation (time) to come here to see sports. (It would) be good for Chino Valley's economy," he said.

Third-grader James McCormick wants a quad track so people who ride quads won't have to drive long distances and cross dangerous roads to do so.

"We need a Long John Silver Restaurant because we don't have a fish restaurant (in Chino Valley)," second-grader Robert Schecker said. "Fish is a healthy meal for people."

Second-grader Cissy Gillo was one of two students wanting an Indian museum.

"A museum will make more people to come to our town. I like Indians because I live where there are Indian artifacts," she said.

Several of Romney's students also want a zoo in Chino Valley.