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7:06 PM Thu, Sept. 20th

PV retiree finds little time for hobbies

Brett Soldwedel/The Daily Courier<br>Marty Grossman, volunteer with Habitat for Humanity, helped construct this house in Chino Valley. The volunteers were putting final touches on landscaping this past Thursday.

Brett Soldwedel/The Daily Courier<br>Marty Grossman, volunteer with Habitat for Humanity, helped construct this house in Chino Valley. The volunteers were putting final touches on landscaping this past Thursday.

PRESCOTT VALLEY - Marty Grossman retired from a 30-year career with the U.S. Postal Service in New York City in February 2009, and moved to Prescott Valley eight months later.

But despite the slower pace in exurban Arizona, Grossman said he finds little time for leisurely pursuits.

He volunteers on the construction crew of Prescott Area Habitat for Humanity, serves on the organizing committee for the March of Babies fundraiser of the March of Dimes and takes part in events of the Prescott Valley Police Foundation. He also graduated from the 10-week Prescott Valley Citizens Academy - which trains residents for leadership roles - and regularly attends Town Council meetings.

"Doing all this other stuff, who has time for hobbies?" Grossman asked rhetorically.

Concurring, Judy York, who chairs March for Babies, said, "I think Marty is a professional volunteer. That is his new job since he retired."

Volunteering is nothing new for Grossman, who was born in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. He said he was a boy scout during his youth and has belonged to clubs since the age of 17.

Six years after graduating from high school in 1967, Grossman said he began participating with annual telethons of the Muscular Dystrophy Association in New York City.

Grossman said he ended his involvement after the association moved its telethon to a television studio in New Jersey in 1984. However, he subsequently began his 26-year association with the March of Dimes.

March of Dimes is "dearest to my heart," Grossman said, because his late father, Alfred, was stricken with polio as a child.

Grossman is preparing for the March of Babies fundraiser Sept. 11 at the Yavapai County Courthouse Plaza by conducting interviews with radio stations, posting fliers and soliciting prizes for walkers from businesses, York said. The event raises money for medical research.

"We want every baby to be home healthy," Grossman said. "It is that simple. When you meet the families, you hear their success stories."

Grossman contacted March of Dimes officials before he moved to Prescott Valley, and brings passion to the organization and the event, York said.

He became involved with Habitat for Humanity this past November, and spends three days a week with the organization, which builds homes for people with modest incomes.

"It is just a great bunch of people," Grossman said. "You are giving homes to families who would otherwise not afford them. When the kids grow up in a home, they grow up better. There is more stability."

Grossman brings a positive attitude to Habitat, said Gail Martin, director of volunteer services.

"He is helpful," she said. "He steps up to the plate when we have a situation. He has become a tool manager because we have a problem of keeping track of our tools and keeping them organized."

Martin continued, "He is like the Energizer Bunny. He's got a great sense of humor. He is willing to do whatever it takes."

Grossman, who has never been married, finds time for a social life. He is active with Prescott Single Boomers, which posts its calendar on Meetup.com.

"I am just looking for companionship and friendship," he said.