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Sat, Oct. 19

Setbacks will not delay summer completion of Prescott Valley library

Matt Hinshaw/The Daily Courier<br>
Dan Hurley, site superintendent for Barton Malow Design and Construction Services, shows where the observation deck will be at the construction site of the new Prescott Valley Library Friday afternoon.

Matt Hinshaw/The Daily Courier<br> Dan Hurley, site superintendent for Barton Malow Design and Construction Services, shows where the observation deck will be at the construction site of the new Prescott Valley Library Friday afternoon.

Construction of the Prescott Valley Public Library building, which began in January 2008, remains on schedule despite a setback this past fall, a town government official said Friday.

"We lost a little time with the steel construction, probably a month," Capital Projects Coordinator Kim Moon said. "We were moving kind of slow with the erection of the steel."

However, she said, "It's not going to delay the opening" of the library, which is under construction on a 4.6-acre site near the Civic Center off Lakeshore Drive and Civic Circle.

The 52,000-square-foot building, which will contain 13,000 square feet housing offices and classrooms for Yavapai College, will be complete in July, August or September, according to Moon.

"We will have dates released, hopefully," this week, Moon said.

The building is 65 percent to 70 percent complete, said Dan Hurley, site superintendent of Barton Malow, the Tempe-based construction company that landed the library contract.

Overall construction costs are at $25 million, town officials estimated, including the contribution from Yavapai College and interest payments on bond financing.

"We are down to the exterior skin (metal panels) and glass windows and interior finishes, which would be drywall," Hurley said. "(What is) left remaining is the parking lot."

Hurley and Moon conducted a half-hour tour of the construction site for the news media Friday afternoon. Tour participants donned hardhats as they walked through the site on a windy afternoon.

Moon pointed to the one-story structure on the right that will house the college. A breezeway will connect the college to the library portion of the building.

"You will be able to drive people to the front," Moon said.

Tour members climbed a step onto the concrete floor of the college. Hurley referred to the packages of insulation lying on the floor.

The college area will house four classrooms and six offices, Moon said.

Hurley pointed to the elevator leading to the second floor of the future library, which will be topped by an observation deck. The building will be 68 feet high.

He said 75 to 100 construction crew members work on the site during the week, with a smaller crew on Saturdays.

Hurley and Moon led the group through a walkway between the college and the library,

He mentioned the steel siding of the exterior of the building will not be treated.

That way the steel will "weather naturally," Moon said.

Hurley commented, "I think it is going to be a beautiful building when it is done."

He said the second floor of the building will contain a mixture of glass and see-through synthetic panels, adding the courtyard will be enclosed.

As Hurley and Moon continued the tour, construction workers pounded sledgehammers on the exterior of an elevator shaft, and shoveled dirt.

The workers are getting ready to pour the floor for the auditorium portion of the library, Hurley said.

"In fact, this is the final concrete they are going to pour," he said.

He said Barton Malow bought cement from local suppliers, and did business with local rental companies.

The library will have 175 parking spaces, Hurley added.

Town officials wanted a new library because the existing library is outgrowing the 13,000 square feet that it has occupied since 1999 on the third floor of the Civic Center.

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