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Fri, Nov. 15

Goddard honors Humboldt District's meth poster winners

Trib Photo/Sue Tone<br>
Arizona Attorney General Terry Goddard honors three Glassford Hill Middle School students who earned an honorable mention in a statewide poster contest through the Arizona Meth Project. From left are eighth graders Jessika Bystrom, Jacob Bryan, and Julia Lough, with AG Terry Goddard.

Trib Photo/Sue Tone<br> Arizona Attorney General Terry Goddard honors three Glassford Hill Middle School students who earned an honorable mention in a statewide poster contest through the Arizona Meth Project. From left are eighth graders Jessika Bystrom, Jacob Bryan, and Julia Lough, with AG Terry Goddard.

Three eighth graders from Glassford Hill Middle School received 2008 Not Even Once posters and $25 in cash from Arizona Attorney General Terry Goddard on Tuesday.

Jessika Bystrom, Jacob Bryan and Julia Lough were three of 15 eighth-grade students earning an honorable mention for their artwork out of 240 entrants from around the state who participated in a poster contest as part of Goddard's anti-meth campaign.

GHMS art teacher Julie Rodriguez said all of her eighth grade art students entered the contest after learning about the effects of methamphetamine use during a three-week period. Detectives from the Prescott Valley Police Department visited her classroom with information and presentations on the drug that Goddard calls a "real and growing problem in Arizona."

"Arizona has twice the national average of self-admitted meth use," he told the three students, their parents, and Prescott Valley and Humboldt Unified School District dignitaries.

The Arizona Meth Project is part of the state's meth program to make sure young people and parents know how incredibly dangerous meth is, Goddard said. This is the second year eighth graders have participated in a poster project.

PV Mayor Harvey Skoog said Goddard is on track with his message.

"Once is too many. The caution again to all your friends is don't touch it," Skoog said to the students.

Jacob Ryan's poster is pencil with some color. He said he had to do something for the assignment and knew he could do a pencil drawing easily.

Julia Lough also chose to do her poster in pencil. The effect was to give it a more empty feeling, she said. Lough learned about meth, not from personal experience, but from videos and information given to her by the police officers.

Jessika Bystrom said she immediately connected a skull to the fact that meth use can lead to death.

"I put a girl behind the skull to show that meth affects even innocent people," she said.

Judges selected a Chino Valley girl, Laurel Catanzariti from Heritage Middle School, as the first place winner. Wells Fargo and the Arizona Dental Association donated money for the cash prizes.

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