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1:06 AM Sun, Sept. 23rd

Dance in the grass (skirt)

Courier/Nathaniel Kastelic
Hanauo¹ Hawaii performs Saturday afternoon drawing a large crowd as the Worlds Arts Festival begins at the Prescott Valley Civic Center.

Courier/Nathaniel Kastelic Hanauo¹ Hawaii performs Saturday afternoon drawing a large crowd as the Worlds Arts Festival begins at the Prescott Valley Civic Center.

PRESCOTT VALLEY ­ Persephone Dimson roamed around the grounds of the Civic Center here Saturday afternoon wearing an outfit with a map of the world, globe earrings and a propeller on her cap. Why the propeller?

"You've got to travel when you are around the world," Dimson said.

Dimson wore a fashion statement at the fourth annual World Arts Festival for which she was in charge of children's entertainment and coordinating mistress of ceremonies. The free event concludes today.

The event features more entertainment this year, Dimson said as she walked by a tent featuring the Hanauo' Hawaiian Dancers.

The festival drew an estimated 3,500 people as of 2:40 p.m. Saturday ­ compared with a combined attendance of fewer than 2,000 people in 2004 ­ said Patti Evans, director of parks and recreation for Prescott Valley. Event-goers filled up the parking lot at Town Hall and overflowed onto both sides of Civic Center Drive.

"We did more advertising" this year, Evans said. "We have great entertainment, and we have involvement of community groups."

The festival drew Rob Butts and Larry Preston, both of Prescott Valley, for the first time.

"I think it is pretty cool," said Butts, a backhoe operator who showed up with his girlfriend, Jyl Sodd, also of Prescott Valley. "I really like the Native American flutist. I like a lot of the (Indian) artwork. I like some of the jewelry. That is something my girlfriend is into."

The weather appealed to first-time vendor Joyce Schrieber of Chino Valley. She used the event to showcase her glasswork, which included lamps, lamp shades, inserts for doors and windows and decorative platters.

Musician J.P. Thom-Gronachan talked about the Louisiana roots of the music that his five-man band, the Black Leather Zydeco Band, performs and the devastation left by Hurricane Katrina.

"If they are going to put the town (New Orleans) back to where it was, they are going to have to build up the levees and improve the infrastructure," he said.