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Trusted local news leader for Prescott area communities since 1882
7:52 PM Sat, Sept. 22nd

Water alert:

PRESCOTT – Scorching summer heat and steadily increasing demand on Prescott’s municipal water system have prompted City Manager Steve Norwood to issue a water-conservation alert.

Norwood is asking city water customers to reduce water use during this peak demand period to ensure the city has ample water in storage for a wildfire and to lighten the load on the city’s water transmission system.

“Until the monsoon arrives in earnest, we need our water customers to use water wisely and reduce water consumption when and where they can,” Norwood said. “Reducing daily demand will help us keep our storage tanks full and avoid over-taxing the water system.”

Specifically, Norwood is requesting that:

• Properties with street addresses ending in odd numbers water outdoors only after 8 p.m. on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, and end watering by 8 a.m. the following day.

• Properties with street addresses ending in even numbers water outdoors only after 8 p.m. on Wednesdays, Fridays and Sundays, ending by 8 a.m. the following day.

• All properties refrain from watering between 8 a.m. Monday and 8 p.m. Tuesday.

In addition, the city is asking all water customers to use shut-off nozzles for outdoor water, car washing and other outdoor uses. The city also is reminding residents that allowing irrigation water to flow into public streets or adjoining properties is a violation of city code.

The city issued the water conservation alert in response to the latest water-demand statistics. For example, water demand reached 11.65 million gallons on Monday – the highest so far this dry season. Water demand has averaged more than 9 million gallons per day this month, with the numbers steadily increasing until this week’s rains.

The city estimates its maximum production capability per day at 12.9 million gallons. Officials would prefer that water demand stay well below that figure, however, for infrastructure stability and fire safety reasons.

Norwood said if daily water demand exceeds 12 million gallons for two consecutive 24-hour periods, it may be necessary to impose mandatory water restrictions.

Prescott water customers interested in learning more about water conservation may call 777-CITY to receive a free water audit and conservation kit.