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Trusted local news leader for Prescott area communities since 1882
8:21 AM Tue, Sept. 18th

Letters to the Editor

Let's not sacrifice those stem cells

EDITOR:

Why are people confused about arguments over adult stem cells (ASC) and embryonic stem cells (ESC)?

Most people do not understand the difference in the origin of the two different types of stem cells.

ASC's come from the excess blood left in the umbilical cord when they cut the cord at birth. Some parents are storing the umbilical cord blood of their newborns for use later to treat a life-threatening disease. For more than 20 years, researchers have recovered ASC routinely from bone marrow.

Doctors use bone marrow transplants of adult stem cells in the United States many thousands of times each year. More recently they have recovered ASC from the brain, olfactory bulb, skin, muscle, heart, liver, fat and many other organs. When medical science removes them from your own body and uses them to repair damage to your body, no tissue rejection results.

Embryonic stem cells (ESC) come from embryos. Researchers can obtain them from two different groups of embryos: 1) aborted embryos (miscarriages), drug-induced abortions and surgical abortions or 2) cloned embryos from somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Both of these sources of ESC require the death of the embryo either by the abortion or by the extraction of the stem cells from the cloned human embryos.

It is abhorrent to me and others to think that we would sacrifice these earliest embryonic forms of human life to try to cure another human. The union of 23 male chromosomes combine with the 23 female chromosomes to form a unique human with all the potential of any human. Likewise, a cloned human formed by SCNT has a similar potential although it is extremely unlikely researchers could bring it to birth. To destroy either of these earliest humans purposes is a most dreadful experiment.

Albert C. Diddams, M.D.

Dewey

Camera radar is big help at intersections

EDITOR:

Re: Camera radar: Again, our local government came up with another bad idea ­ declining to put camera radar at intersections where most of our local accidents occur.

The other bad idea? The garage. The last time I read about camera radar they turned it down because "it would give Prescott a bad name."

Ask Scottsdale for details and let's vote up or down on the subject. With two accidents at Sunrise and Highway 69 recently, sounds to me it might have given somebody a ticket or saved an accident.

Bill Dunn

Prescott

Sort of a downer at Yavapai Downs

EDITOR:

I went to a few races at Yavapai Downs on opening weekend. After reading your articles on how well they were doing, I didn't think I was at the same track. Attendance still appears very low. Lines of customers were shut out of bets, because they didn't have enough tellers. The third floor was warm and stuffy because the air conditioning was not on. The infield looked like a training ground for dozer operators.

I sure miss the old track.

Jeff Dykeman

Prescott Valley

Many helped boost Highland Games

EDITOR:

On behalf of the Prescott Highland Games Committee, I want to thank everyone who came ­ to Diana Fister from the City Parks and Recreation Department who was so helpful to us, and especially to our sponsors and donors, who made it all possible.

The sponsors were: Celtic Builders (Jason Temple); MacMillan Construction Co.; Bob and Lauren Frisby, Realty Experts/Hastings Branch; Gary Hirn/Imaging Systems, Pepsi Cola; Hensley and Co./Budweiser; McIlvain Motor Co.; Prescott Floors; KFPB radio; Custom Electric; York Dodge, Chrysler and Jeep; Alliance Beverage; Granite Creek Vineyards; James Saur, CPA; AZ Music Pro; Marler's Furniture Store; Kooiman Realty; Galpin Ford; West Valley Scots; Celtic Bar Association; Lloyds' Liquor; Reddy Ice of Prescott.

We had too many supporters and volunteers to mention here, but they were all invaluable in making the first Prescott Highland Games and Festival the success that it was. If you would like to be a part of organizing the games for next year, or will be a volunteer (for a three- to four-hour shift) at next year's games, call me at 771-1218.

David W. McNabb

Prescott