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Trusted local news leader for Prescott area communities since 1882
7:09 AM Tue, Sept. 18th

The human condition changes with age, wisdom

Here are a few more thoughts about the human condition:

• Cutting to the chase is OK, but we appreciate some yarns, told by some people, more if they can unravel them slowly.

• Hostility to truth leads to bias and prejudice among folks of certain religious faiths whose mission is to inveigle and intimidate others to believe as they do.

• Young feelings and old values continue to prevail inside of me. That's a positive aspect of aging I didn't foresee. The inner me is youthful (in my opinion), just as the outer me is clearly aging.

• Acknowledgment is the first step toward shedding ignorance. Overcoming ignorance requires concentrated, continued effort, whereas innocence, for instance, can be removed in a moment.

• How conflicted we are about lawful vices, especially when they encroach on us or our neighborhoods.

• Have you ever wondered about the correlation between stubbornness and conceit?

• The older I become the more I find my body functioning as a relentless seesaw.

• I can become embarrassed by what I say to others and, suprisingly, by what I say to myself in solitude.

• How many of us know that we sometimes say silly things and take them seriously?

• If practice makes perfect, none of us will have a perfect death.

• Blessed are the elderly whose children continue to love and respect them when their failings and flaws begin to dictate the quality of their lives.

• People who publicly speak well of themselves will likely discover they will be going solo on the subject.

• Self-righteous people and sinners unintentionally share an identity.

• Is there enlightenment in believing that different religions offer access to God or is enlightenment based on the belief that only your religion offers such access?

• If the leaders of your nation murder people and another nation's leaders find this act reprehensible, why does that give them the right to kill you?

(Ron Barnes is a longtime Prescott resident and a semi-retired educator and businessman.)