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Trusted local news leader for Prescott area communities since 1882
8:59 PM Sat, Nov. 17th

<b><center>Letters to the Editor</b></center>

Political leaders bend to big business interests

EDITOR:

The future is cloudy for family-oriented small businesses in rural Arizona, because special-interest political leadership exploits small business with inequitable taxation.

Inept leadership and waste at all levels of government is out of control, hence bloated unbalanced budgets. Arizona's history of promoting individual responsibility is under siege. Blinded to cause and effect, leadership appears willing to sacrifice small businesses while pandering to large "public" revenue generators to increase civic spending opportunities.

Tax abatement, exemptions and subsidies fuel governmental squandering and incubate more special interest. Unfair concessions to perceived "economic engines" cripple entrepreneurial opportunity, and moral leaders would stop it.

Arizona was a sanctuary for "free enterprise." Government crawling into bed with "Big Business" at every opportunity has irreparably damaged the ability for small business to operate profitably. Bureaucratic feeding frenzies at troughs swollen with the carrying charges of special interest have compromised entrepreneurial freedom and raise questions about this polluted coalition's intent.

Entrepreneurial success from hard work is a strong motivation for economic rape. We didn't build Arizona's quality of life and allure to new residents on the back of big business, greedy politicians or opportunistic trough suckers.

Small businesses in rural Arizona may follow the decline of Arizona's mining, ranching and timber industries. The high-principled character that forged this great state must not give way to busy-body intrusionists, special interest predators and bureaucratic thieves.

I support rural Arizona candidates who resist the Maricopa and Washington, D.C., party line two-step. We should elect rural Arizonans to represent our pocket books and make us their political special interest.

A governor from rural Arizona will resolve state budgetary problems more objectively than those with political lien holders in Maricopa County.

Jim Lamerson

Prescott

Attacks on evolution hark back to 1611

EDITOR:

Articles in your paper continually attack evolution. This is reminiscent of the attack on Galileo Galilei. In 1611, Galileo demonstrated the correctness of the Copernicus theory that the earth revolved around the sun. That contradicted church teaching that the universe revolved around the earth. If they had taken a public survey at that time, probably 90 percent of the citizens would have agreed with the church.

Apparently Galileo embarrassed the church politically, so, for this heresy, he spent the last eight years of his life in house arrest. Today, virtually everyone agrees with the truth of Galileo's finding because of the overwhelming amount of facts in support of the theory.

We are reliving the same process today, where evolution stands in opposition to creationist theory. Our modern day Galileo is called Stephan Jay Gould, who has written a monumental work on evolution available at our local library. Propaganda it is not.

The present accretion of facts supporting evolution by biologists, paleontologists, biochemists, and geologists again is overwhelming. Niles Eldridge, another towering figure in support of evolution, has written a book, "The Triumph of Evolution." It uses these facts to address the fallacies of creationist arguments. It is also available at our local library.

Robert Chanaud

Prescott

Road work zones need proper signing

EDITOR:

Why do the Arizona Department of Transportation, and local governments allow their own workers and contractors to continue to neglect the safety of their workers and the travelling public by not enforcing their own standards on proper and legal work zone signing.

The manual of uniform traffic control devices clearly states all of the legal methods for placement and sizes of work zone signing for all roadways in Arizona.

Now, they are doubling the fines in work zones for violations on their illegally signed work zones. I have personally helped eight out of nine citizens get out of their citations by showing the laws stated in the manual of uniform traffic control devices to them and explaining to them how to present it to the judge. All at no charge.

Although, I could make a pretty good living charging for it, I resigned from ADOT in 1995. I was the regional signing and striping supervisor, so I do know the facts. I would love to sit down and share the information that I have regarding this subject, and some serious traffic accidents that were preventable. I think the public has the right to this information, and would be very interested in what I have to tell them. In the meantime, if anyone gets a citation in a work zone, snap a photo of the area, and give me a call for free advice.

John DeJoseph

Prescott