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Jordan Kobritz

Stories by Jordan

Column: Cowboys’ owner Jerry Jones at war with NFL

'Beyond the Lines'

Forget the Russian probe. Jerry Jones versus the NFL – and Commissioner Roger Goodell – is the most interesting legal matter in the country.

Column: Republican tax bill targets national sports scene

'Beyond the Lines'

The long-awaited Republican tax plan unveiled last week contained proposals which would benefit some taxpayers and negatively impact others. The sports world is no exception.

Column: Baseball managers are hired to be fired

'Beyond the Lines'

Baseball managers have never had much security, with the exception of Connie Mack who remained in the dugout for 53 years.

Column: NCAA punts on North Carolina academic fraud

'Beyond the Lines'

One of the most recognizable sports acronyms is NCAA, which stands for the National Collegiate Athletic Association. After the governing body’s recent ruling on the University of North Carolina (UNC) academic fraud case, it might as well stand for “Not Concerned with Academic Accountability.”

Column: Derek Jeter’s success as MLB owner no sure thing

'Beyond the Lines'

Derek Jeter, Major League Baseball team owner. The title may not be as familiar as shortstop and captain of the New York Yankees, but after MLB owners approved his group’s offer to purchase the Miami Marlins, Jeter is now a part owner of the team.

Column: Bribery kickback scandal rocks college basketball world

'Beyond the Lines'

Last week a New York federal court handed up indictments charging a number of assistant coaches, agents, financial advisers and shoe company employees with corruption in recruiting amateur basketball players.

Column: President Trump takes on NFL owners, players

'Beyond the Lines'

Leave it to President Donald Trump to stir up a controversy at a time when he should have been dealing with the myriad issues confronting the country. But as untimely as his actions to take on the NFL players and owners may have been, that doesn’t mean he was entirely wrong.

Column: NFL overestimates Los Angeles market, again

'Beyond the Lines'

Greed can motivate human beings to do things they might regret upon hindsight.

Column: The intersection of sports and politics is muddled

'Beyond the Lines'

The synergy between sports and entertainment has existed since time immemorial.

Column: Sign stealing in baseball a kerfuffle

'Beyond the Lines'

The Red Sox-Yankees rivalry is alive and well, on and off the field.

Column: Baseball to enact fan code of conduct in 2018

'Beyond the Lines'

In the aftermath of a racially charged incident at Fenway Park earlier this season, MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred announced that the league would adopt a Fan Code of Conduct beginning with the 2018 season.

Column: Computerized umps in baseball on the horizon

'Beyond the Lines'

Controversies in baseball are virtually endless. The designated hitter, instant replay, inter-league play, wild cards, pace of play — and on and on it goes. Here’s another topic that is starting to heat up: Robot umpires.

Column: Disney joins the cord-cutting revolution

'Beyond the Lines'

In a nod to the “if you can’t beat them, join them” idiom, the Walt Disney Company has decided to join the cord cutting revolution.

Column: Can chewing gum boost sports performance on the field?

'Beyond the Lines'

Jordan Spieth won this year’s British Open, golf’s oldest tournament, in dramatic fashion but that may not be the most enduring memory of his performance.

Column: Big money salaries in sports can be sustained

'Beyond the Lines'

NBA free agency opened on July 1 and teams wasted no time in signing their own or other teams’ free agents to what may appear to be exorbitant contracts.

Column: Relegation in US sports leagues a tough sell

'Beyond the Lines'

Four billion dollars. That’s a significant sum in virtually any context, unless we’re talking about the federal budget. And yet Major League Soccer (MLS) said “no thanks” to an offer that would have netted the league that amount over a 10-year period.

Column: LGPA fashion police out of control

'Beyond the Lines'

Beware! The fashion police are coming to a golf course near you.

Column: Did the All-Star Game lose its appeal?

'Beyond the Lines'

The MLB All-Star Game is now the equal of its counterparts in the NFL, NBA and NHL — an exhibition, not a game.

Column: MLB umpire sues league for racial discrimination

'Beyond the Lines'

On the eve of baseball’s celebration of our nation’s birth, MLB umpire Angel Hernandez filed a lawsuit against the league and Commissioner Rob Manfred alleging racial discrimination against minority umpires.

Column: Collect more federal revenue, without raising taxes

'Beyond the Lines'

Sound the trumpets, Congress has introduced yet another bill to eliminate the federal tax benefit of using municipal bonds to finance the construction of sports stadiums.

Column: Washington Redskins win legal case in trademark battle

'Beyond the Lines'

On an 8-0 vote, the U.S. Supreme Court effectively overturned a U.S. District Court case that decided the Washington Redskins name violated the disparagement clause of the Lanham Act. The irony is that the Redskins weren’t even a party to the case.

COLUMN: Don’t take records away without proof

Track and field’s longest-standing outdoor world record is in danger, but not from a contestant on the track.

Column: Sports betting in this country is inevitable

'Beyond the Lines'

Sports betting is coming to a place near you, perhaps sooner than you think. And that place may be as close as your hand.

Column: Is the Cuban influx in MLB over?

'Beyond the Lines'

When Luis Robert, a 19-year-old outfielder, signed a free agent contract with the Chicago White Sox last week he was touted in some circles as the last of a dying breed: A Cuban ballplayer signing for mega-bucks.

Column: Does baseball have a safety issue?

Major League Baseball may have a safety issue but contrary to what you’re probably thinking, this one isn’t due to the action on the field.

Column: Baseball justice dumb and dumber

Pardon me if we’ve been here before, but baseball beanball wars are dumb and, for emphasis, dumber.

Column: Do taxes affect winning in professional sports?

The phrase quoted above is often used to describe the persuasive power of numbers, particularly the use of statistics to bolster a weak argument. Which brings us to Erik Hembre, Assistant Professor of Economics at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Column: MLB franchise values continue to rise

For years, polls and pundits have suggested that baseball’s popularity – and economic vitality - is dwindling, especially when compared to football. Based on the most recent estimated MLB franchise values published by Forbes, nothing could be further from the truth.

Column: Dale Jr.’s retirement a huge blow to NASCAR

The day after one member of the media opined that Dale Earnhardt, Jr. was “stuck in neutral” in his comeback from concussions, the NASCAR icon suddenly announced his retirement, effective at the end of the season.

Column: After 273 years, Muirfield finally goes co-ed

Muirfield Golf Club in Scotland, which has hosted 16 previous British Open Championships, recently voted to admit women for the first time in the club’s 273-year history.

Column: NFL concussion case shows lawyers at their worst

Even on their good days attorneys have been known to act, well, not so well. Luckasevic had to be upset to utter such a strong indictment of the legal profession.

Column: Shohei Ohtani, Japan’s Babe Ruth

The Major League Baseball season got underway last week and stars such as Mike Trout, Mookie Betts and Clayton Kershaw will spend the next six months burnishing their reputations as the best in the game. But perhaps the best player on the planet will not be wearing an MLB uniform this year.

Column: Women’s hockey team wins on and off ice

Very united. Very strong. Persevering.” Those words were used by defender Gigi Marvin to describe the Women’s National Hockey team’s 2-0 win over the Canadians in the opening game of the Women’s World Championship.

Column: Is Theo Epstein the world’s greatest leader?

When we think of a great leader, our search may instinctively turn to business or government. Fortune magazine, which publishes an annual list of the World’s 50 Greatest Leaders, includes individuals from two additional categories: philanthropy and “beyond.” This year, Fortune turned to the beyond category and selected Theo Epstein as the World’s Greatest Leader.

Column: Cuban smuggling case a stain on Major League Baseball

While most baseball fans have been focusing on the excitement of spring training in Florida and Arizona, or the emotion of the World Baseball Classic being played around the globe, a seamy side of the sport was being detailed in a Miami courtroom.

Column: Nike shoe much ado about nothing

Sports are about human participation but there’s no denying that technology has an impact on performance. Is there a point where technology gives some performers an unfair advantage and creates artificial outcomes? That’s an endless debate, one that is currently underway in running circles.

Column: MLB pace of play idea has universal appeal

MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred has finally proposed an idea that every baseball fan can embrace: reducing commercial time during games.

Column: NASCAR’s big changes start at Daytona 500

NASCAR began its 2017 season on Sunday in the traditional way, with the Daytona 500. But if you ask the sport’s most loyal fans, that’s about all the tradition that remains.

Column: Knicks most valuable, most dysfunctional team in NBA

The New York Knicks are the most valuable team in the NBA, worth $3.3 billion according to Forbes’ latest estimate. They’re also the most dysfunctional team in the league, if not all of professional sports.

Column: MLB serves up ... softball

As owner of the Kansas City/Oakland Athletics from 1960-80, Charles O. Finley had more creative ideas than all his fellow owners combined.

Column: Cyber attacks exist in sports, too

Cyber-attacks have become all too common in the United States. Millions of Americans have been victims of identity theft after their personal information was accessed. The most frequent targets of criminals are databases of financial institutions, hospitals and retail outlets, although Ashley Madison also comes to mind.

Column: NFL parity is a myth

The NFL loves to portray itself as the league with the most parity. On any given Sunday – which in reality is now Monday, Thursday and, depending on the time of the year, Saturday – any team can win.

Column: Baseball HOF voting falls short

The highly anticipated and always controversial voting for the Baseball Hall of Fame is in the books for another year. Members of the Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) elected three players – Jeff Bagwell, Tim Raines and Pudge Rodriguez – for enshrinement in the Hall’s plaque room. But it’s who wasn’t elected that drew the most attention.

Column: Chargers flee San Diego for LaLa Land

The lessons I learned from my grandfather have stuck with me. One in particular came to mind when I read the announcement by San Diego Chargers owner Dean Spanos that the team would dessert a loyal fan base in San Diego for Los Angeles.

Column: Specialization in youth sports has dangers

In his book Outliers: The Story of Success, Malcolm Gladwell suggested that 10,000 hours of quality training in a specific discipline could, in most cases, turn anyone into an expert, even an elite level athlete. Unfortunately, a number of coaches and parents too eagerly embrace Gladwell’s theory when it comes to youth sports.

Column: Some key sports business stories in 2016

This is the time of year when I offer my predictions for the biggest sports business stories of the next 12 months. ... Although I did bat 1,000 last year, there were a number of important stories that were either omitted due to space limitations or I flat-out missed.

Column: Marlins owner Jeffrey Loria about to cash in

Move over Ozzie and Daniel Silna. The brothers parlayed a $1 million investment in an American Basketball Association team in 1974 into an estimated $800 million return from NBA television rights over a period of 40 years.

Column: Vegas Golden Knights not so golden

One of the most ballyhooed — and important — events in the birth of a sport franchise is the public unveiling of a team’s name and logo.

Column: Restoring integrity to competition in sports

If you thought McLaren I was a blockbuster, you haven’t read McLaren II. Richard McLaren is the Canadian attorney who earlier this year was commissioned by WADA – the World Anti- Doping Agency – to investigate allegations that Russia engaged in a doping scandal designed to thwart testing of its athletes.

Column: It’s time for coaches to shine

This is the time of year when college football games really matter

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