Prescott Fire puts down more roadway blazes

Firefighters from Prescott, Central and the Forest Service worked Friday to put down a series of fires along Iron Springs Road, about seven miles west of Prescott. (Prescott Fire/Courtesy)

Firefighters from Prescott, Central and the Forest Service worked Friday to put down a series of fires along Iron Springs Road, about seven miles west of Prescott. (Prescott Fire/Courtesy)

Firefighters once again have had to respond to wildland fires located along the side of the road, Prescott Fire Paramedic Engineer Conrad Jackson reported Friday.

Two Prescott Fire engines and a Central Arizona Fire and Medical Authority engine responded to reports of multiple grass fires along the side of Iron Springs Road, seven miles west of the city, he said.

Because of the dry conditions, the Forest Service responded with an additional two engines, a Hotshot crew, and a helicopter to assist in fire suppression.

Jackson said the arriving engines found four separate fires spread out along roughly a half mile of the road, with the largest being one-quarter of an acre in size.

All of the fires were located on the south side of the road, he stated, which was fortunate as the prevailing southwest winds kept pushing the fire toward the road — instead of into the canyon below the road.

Firefighters were able to quickly stop the fires’ progress and keep their size to a minimum. The Forest Service remained on scene to ensure that all hot spots remained out.

The cause of the fires is undetermined but is suspected to be the result of chains from a towed trailer striking the highway and sparking, officials reported. This is a frequently seen, and wholly preventable ignition source, that has already resulted in almost two dozen fires locally in the past two weeks.

The Prescott Fire Department implores everyone to correctly adjust their safety chains when towing so that sparking will not be an issue, Jackson said.

In addition, Yavapai County — including municipalities and the public lands — remain in Stage II Fire Restrictions, which ban smoking outside of vehicles or buildings, camp fires, and use of combustion engines that can produce a spark. This also affects welding and other tools that create sparks.

Check with your local fire department, police or the Sheriff’s Office if you have questions.