Pima Community likely to cut football after 2018 season

Sports in Brief

TUCSON — Pima Community College in Tucson is considering eliminating its football program after next season in order to reach mandated budget cuts.

The college’s governing board met Wednesday and officials say the golf and tennis programs also could be eliminated after the 2018-19 season.

Pima College athletic director Edgar Soto reportedly has been ordered to cut more than $500,000 from the budget.

The Aztec’s football program costs about that much per year to operate.

Four months ago, the Maricopa County Community College District announced the elimination of its football programs after the 2018 season because of ongoing financial constraints.

Phoenix College, Scottsdale Community College, Mesa Community College and Glendale Community College are the only ones with football programs among the district’s 10 schools.

Cardinals sign punter Andy Lee to 2-year extension

TEMPE — The Arizona Cardinals have signed punter Andy Lee to a two-year contract extension through 2020.

Financial terms of the deal weren’t disclosed Thursday.

The 35-year-old Lee averaged 47.3 yards last season, his first with Arizona, to break the franchise record and finish seventh in the NFL.

Lee has a 46.4-yard average in 217 games in 14 seasons with San Francisco, Cleveland, Carolina and Arizona. He’s a three-time Pro Bowl and All-Pro selection.

A 7 and a 78: Ugly numbers for Tiger Woods in US Open

SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. — As Tiger Woods stood in the middle of the first fairway, the last thing on his mind was a 7.

That number was the first thing on his scorecard Thursday in the U.S. Open.

It didn’t get better on his way to another ugly number, a first-round 78.

“I just didn’t get off to a good start,” Woods said. “I drove good most of the day, just didn’t do much from there. I just didn’t putt well.”

It wasn’t his worst opener in this tournament. Woods shot an 80 at Chambers Bay three years ago, his most recent U.S. Open before back surgeries sidelined him.

Woods rallied by playing the rest of the front nine at 1-under par. After that, his putting fluctuated from spotty to just plain bad, including four putts on the 13th.

“It was not very good,” he said of unlucky No. 13. “I was worried about running the (first) putt by, it would be downhill (coming back). I blocked the next one, (and) blocked the next one. It was not very good.”

Nope, it wasn’t. Shinnecock Hills pushed him around the way it did so many other top names and supposed contenders. A 15th major championship and first in 10 years appears beyond improbable for the greatest golfer of his generation.