Letter: Real Thanksgiving

Editor:

The Thanksgiving article written by Nanci Hutson on the first page of The Daily Courier on Nov. 21 spoke to the “First Thanksgiving” and the sharing of bounty by Pilgrims and Native Americans.

This first ‘Thanksgiving’ is a nice myth, but not really reality.

The Pilgrims did have a feast, but it was not repeated for many years, and they did not call it Thanksgiving.

Native Americans were apparently invited to that feast so that a treaty could be negotiated to secure land for the Pilgrims.

Then, in 1637, a Thanksgiving was celebrated after over 700 Pequot men, women, and children were massacred, with only a few Pequot surviving.

Massachusetts Bay Governor John Winthrop set forth a proclamation that the day would be a day of thanksgiving for that slaughter.

So, we celebrate our Thanksgiving each year and enjoy good food and the company of relatives and friends; however, let us not forget the true history of that day and recognize that our Native American population has a different take on the history of “Thanksgiving Day.”

Sharon Tice

Prescott