Council to ponder water for Deep Well Ranch

Tuesday’s work study second looking at 1,800-acre project

Crews work on the infrastructure where the future Deep Well Ranch subdivision is planned to be centered. (Les Stukenberg/Courier)

Crews work on the infrastructure where the future Deep Well Ranch subdivision is planned to be centered. (Les Stukenberg/Courier)

Water allocations for the proposed Deep Well Ranch project will be among the topics discussed during a Prescott City Council study session this week.

The meeting is set for 1 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 7, at Prescott City Hall, 201 S. Cortez St.

It will be the second City Council workshop on the 1,800-acre project that developers plan on Deep Well Ranch land in northeast Prescott.

At the conclusion of the first workshop on Oct. 31, Mayor Harry Oberg told the audience that water would be discussed at the next workshop.

City officials have pointed out that the Deep Well land has the rights to about 950 acre-feet of city water, which would allow for about 3,200 homes. The city has also committed about 900 acre-feet more of water from the Big Chino Water Ranch — if and when the pipeline from the Paulden area is complete.

The Deep Well master plan proposes as many as 10,500 homes over the next four to five decades, and developers have noted that in order to reach that total, other sources of water would be needed.

Meanwhile, the Prescott Planning and Zoning Commission suggested that the City Council negotiate a 50-percent reduction in the 10,500 homes proposed by Deep Well.

A council memo for the Nov. 7 meeting lists five other items that also will be discussed. They include:

• A comparison of key points of development under the existing zoning versus the proposed master plan.

• The Planning and Zoning Commission’s recommended conditions.

• Technical engineering matters that are proposed to be part of the pending development agreement.

• Protections for the airport.

• The framework of the development agreement.

The memo states that city staff “is especially seeking direction” on the technical engineering standards, noting that in the areas where the public works department and the Deep Well planners have not reached a compromise, planners have chosen to shift the matters to the development agreement “for a decision by the City Council.”