Editorial: This fire is a reminder we should all heed

Fire crews both ground and aerial do their best on the Goodwin Fire as it approaches the town of Mayer Tuesday, June 27. (Les Stukenberg/Courier)

Photo by Les Stukenberg.

Fire crews both ground and aerial do their best on the Goodwin Fire as it approaches the town of Mayer Tuesday, June 27. (Les Stukenberg/Courier)

There’s a video of the Goodwin Fire on YouTube showing cars on Highway 69 pulling over so the occupants can watch. A Yavapai County Sheriff’s Office SUV has to park behind them, one-by-one, telling them that there’s a fire coming, they’d like to keep the road clear for emergency personnel, they may have to shut down the highway soon, maybe it would be a good idea not to park here.

Why does anyone need to be told that?

On Friday the Prescott National Forest, Central Arizona Fire and Medical Authority, and Prescott Fire Department are increasing their restrictions to Stage II because of the ongoing threat of wildfire.

The area covered stretches from Paulden to Williamson Valley to Dewey-Humboldt.

Stage II includes a ban of fireworks except for those in a commercial special events, such as a town’s official celebration.

The public should not be buying or setting off fireworks on their own. With the Fourth of July coming, there will be that temptation. Considering the ongoing news, we hope they will not give into it.

In addition to the fireworks ban, under Stage II:

No burn permits will be issued.

Use of model rockets is prohibited.

No smoking out of vehicles, residential yards, or designated smoking areas.

No outdoor use of firearms.

Welding, butting, grinding, and chain saw use are prohibited (permission may be granted under special circumstances and repair situations as approved by the fire marshal).

Warming fires and campfires (ember and ash producing) are prohibited in single and multi-family residences and town parks. This also prohibits the use of other devices that produce open flames, such as tiki lamps.

The use of propane, natural gas or other gas flame-producing barbeque cooking grills may be used at single and multi-family residential properties as long as they are constantly attended, are in an enclosed device, and can be turned off.

With the Goodwin Fire already having threatened many structures and forced people from their homes, and with the anniversary of the deaths of 19 Granite Mountain Hotshots coming on Friday, none of us should need reminding that fire is something we all need to take seriously.

The Daily Courier