Hotshots artwork on display this month

Offers a ‘glimpse of Hotshots’ lives’

An art piece currently on display at The Frame and I in downtown Prescott features two photos that depict the Granite Mountain Hotshots in a frame of engraved juniper wood.

Jenn Winters-Ashcraft/Courtesy photo

An art piece currently on display at The Frame and I in downtown Prescott features two photos that depict the Granite Mountain Hotshots in a frame of engraved juniper wood.

The iconic photo of Granite Mountain Hotshots smiling broadly while in pyramid formation in front of an ancient juniper tree got special treatment recently from a local artist.

“Eternal Remembrance,” a framed artwork by Prescott Certified Picture Framer Francine Hackerott, encases the photo, along with another of the Hotshot Tribute Fence, in a frame of engraved juniper wood.

The piece will be on display through the end of February at The Frame and I, located at 229 W. Gurley St., in downtown Prescott.

As a local resident and longtime picture framer, Hackerott said she wanted to memorialize the 19 young men who died June 2013 fighting the Yarnell Hill Fire.

She came up with the idea of framing the well-known photo, which was taken of the Hotshots after they saved the massive alligator juniper tree from the Doce Fire — just days before the start of the Yarnell Hill Fire.

The tree, which had earlier been designated a “co-champion” through the Arizona State Forestry Division’s Magnificent Trees program because of its age and size, is located in the Prescott National Forest.

To tie in with the photo’s theme, Hackerott decided to use juniper wood for the frame. She started with a 2-foot-by-5-foot piece of juniper, and carved it into a 21-inch-by-18-inch frame.

Ida Kendall, owner of the Frame and I, said she watched intently as Hackerott transformed the piece of raw lumber into a piece that portrays the lives and sacrifices of the Hotshots.

“It’s so gorgeous,” Kendall said of the framed artwork. “It gives a little glimpse into who they were.”

The piece is on display at the Frame and I, and Kendall said members of the public are welcome to stop by to see it.